Tag Archives: age

1668-1676 M. Hruška
Assessment of the actual hand position on the steering wheel for drivers of passenger cars while driving
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Assessment of the actual hand position on the steering wheel for drivers of passenger cars while driving

M. Hruška

Czech University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Technological Equipment of Building, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 21 Prague 6, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: jabko@tf.czu.cz

Abstract:

This work deals with the assessment of the actual position of the hands on the steering wheel of drivers of passenger cars in specific driving modes. The findings are compared with the location that is generally considered to be optimal in terms of both active and passive safety, and the long-term effects on the health of the driver. The research described in this work was carried out on a sample of randomly selected drivers in the Czech Republic. For all of the measurements, one identical neutral passenger middle-class vehicle, with which none of the test subjects had previous experience, was selected. The reason for this research was to model a normal situation where the driver controls a vehicle with his hands on the steering wheel in a position that is only the result of his or her own intuition and the subjective sense of the driver’s comfort. On the basis, of a statistical evaluation of the obtained data, it was found that the introductory hypothesis, which states that a significant part of the tested sample of drivers holds the steering wheel in an unsuitable manner, can be confirmed. This fact negatively impacts not only on the reduction of active and passive safety, but also affects the health of drivers who drive a large amount of kilometres annually. The results of this work can be used in the design of cabs and modern passenger car systems that will be able to motivate the driver to hold the steering wheel in an optimal way. This will directly affect road safety and positively influence the health of drivers.

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1131-1142 A. Tänavots, A. Põldvere, J. Torp, R. Soidla, T. Mahla, H. Andreson andL. Lepasalu
Effect of age on composition and quality of Longissimus thoracis muscle of the moose (Alces alces L.) harvested in Estonia
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Effect of age on composition and quality of Longissimus thoracis muscle of the moose (Alces alces L.) harvested in Estonia

A. Tänavots¹*, A. Põldvere²⋅³, J. Torp², R. Soidla², T. Mahla², H. Andreson² andL. Lepasalu²

¹Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Kreutzwaldi 62, 51014, Tartu, Estonia; *Correspondence: alo.tanavots@emu.ee 2Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kreutzwaldi 56/5, 51014, Tartu, Estonia 3Estonian Pig Breeding Association, Aretuse 2, 61411 Märja, Tartumaa, Estonia

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the biochemical composition and technological parameters of muscle (Longissimus thoracis) from adult and calf moose (Alces alces L.) hunter-harvested in the forest of southern Estonia. The experiment was based on 13 hunted moose, of which seven were adults (two males and five females) and six calves (two males and four females). The highest intramuscular fat (IMF) level was found in adult female moose muscles (1.50%), and the lowest in adult male moose muscle (0.46%). Adult moose muscles had higher IMF level (1.14%) than calves (0.98%) (P = 0.451). The protein content found in the muscle samples of adult moose was 0.64% higher than that in calves (21.80%) (P = 0.045). The moisture content of muscle from adult moose was lower (75.30%) and varied more than that of calves (76.07%) (P = 0.051). The initial (5.00–5.59) and ultimate (5.40–5.64) pH in muscle samples were within the normal range, both in adults and calves, except in one of the hunted female calf that had high pH values (pH45min = 6.60 and pH72hr = 6.90), obviously because of stress. The WHC of moose muscles was considerably high (60.50–75.20%), and cooking loss for thermally processed moose muscle ranged between 19.10% and 33.39%. Muscle sample from adult moose had the highest cooking loss (29.69%) while that from the calves was the lowest (26.42%) (P = 0.191). More force (32.54 N) was needed to share muscle samples from adult moose compared to cutting the samples from calves (23.92 N) (P = 0.374). Based on the results of the experiments it can be concluded that the meat from younger moose had better technological quality and tenderness.

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