Tag Archives: antioxidant activity

1444-1456 L. Nilova and S. Malyutenkova
The possibility of using powdered sea-buckthorn in the development of bakery products with antioxidant properties
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The possibility of using powdered sea-buckthorn in the development of bakery products with antioxidant properties

L. Nilova* and S. Malyutenkova

Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, Institute of Industrial Management, Economics, and Trade, Graduate School of Commodity and Service, Novorossiyskaya street 50, U194021 St. Petersburg, Russia
*Correspondence: nilova_l_p@mai.ru

Abstract:

The article examines ways of increasing the antioxidant capacity of bakery products (referred to here as BP) by adding powdered peel, powdered seeds, and powdered marc produced from sea-buckthorn berries. Three different versions of BP were developed with the maximum addition of the following powders: from the peel (3%), from the marc (5%) with a sugar content of 14.5%; and from seeds (5%) with a sugar content of 5%, and with a potato flake content of 5%. BPs with the addition of sea-buckthorn powders were baked at two temperature regimes: 200°C and 220 °C. The content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and ascorbic acid were determined for the sea-buckthorn powder, for the crust of BP, and in BP crumbs. The antioxidant activity of BP was determined by the use of two methods: by chemiluminescence, and by their reaction to the DPPH-radical. Cyclic amides (lactams) were determined in BP crusts and crumbs with the use of the IR spectroscopy method. The AOA of powdered sea buckthorn depended upon the volume of phenolic compounds and ascorbic acid in them: peel > marc > seeds. The antioxidant properties of BPs decreased in the following order and were aligned the following way: BP with marc > BP with peel > BP with seeds. They displayed higher AOA levels than was calculated in theoretical tests, depending upon the volume of powders in the recipe. An increase of the baking temperature led to a loss of phenolic compounds and vitamin C, as well as to the formation of poly lactams. BP baked at the temperature regime of 200 °C displayed the greatest AOA levels.

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1322-1330 I. Augšpole, M. Dūma and B. Ozola
Bioactive compounds in herbal infusions
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Bioactive compounds in herbal infusions

I. Augšpole*, M. Dūma and B. Ozola

Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Chemistry, Liela iela 2, LV-3000, Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: ingrida.augspole@llu.lv

Abstract:

Herbal teas are very popular and known as important source of biologically active compounds. Some of popular Latvian herbal teas: Calendula (Calendula officinalis L.), Matricaria chamomilla (Matricaria chamomilla), Lady’s-mantle (Alchemilla vulgaris L.), Jasmine (Jasminum officinale L.), Yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.) and Linden flowers (Tilia spp.) were selected for analysis. This study was carried out with the aim to investigate the effect of extraction time (10, 15, 20 min) on the content of total flavonoids and total phenols as well as antioxidant activity of herbal tea extracts. The infusions were prepared by usual domestic preparation technique using ground air-dried plant materials and boiling deionized water (0.055 μS cm-1) for extraction. Content of total flavonoids, total phenols and antioxidant activity was determined spectrophotometrically. Dry matter content was determined in lyophilized herbal infusions. The obtained results indicated that extraction time did not affected the content of biologically active compounds in the herbal infusions significantly (P > 0.05). The highest level of flavonoids was found in Jasmine and Lady’s-mantle infusions (average 104.98 ± 9.21 mg quercetin equivalent 100 g-1 and 115.28 ± 5.25 QE mg 100 g-1 respectivelly), while the lowest was determined in Matricaria chamomilla extract – (average 70.10 ± 4.68 QE mg 100 g-1). Lady’s-mantle tea contained the largest amount of total phenols (average 4126.62 ± 26.24 mg gallic acid equivalents 100g-1), the lowest – Calendula tea 1828.04 ± 10.37 mg GAE 100 g-1). Data analysis showed a close linear positive correlation between the content of total flavonoids and total phenols in herbal infusions (R2 = 0.872; r = 0.934) with the probability of 99%. In general, all samples tested in this study, demonstrated high level of antioxidant activity (from 75.04 to 91.54 mmol Trolox equivalents 100 g-1). Results of the present experiments demonstrated that content of dry matter in analysed herbal teas was significantly different (P < 0.05).

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1546-1554 R. Zarins, Z. Kruma, L. Tomsone, S. Kampuse, I. Skrabule and I.H. Konosonoka
Comparison of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of fresh and freeze-dried potatoes
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Comparison of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of fresh and freeze-dried potatoes

R. Zarins¹, Z. Kruma¹*, L. Tomsone¹, S. Kampuse¹, I. Skrabule² and I.H. Konosonoka²

¹Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Food Technology, Rigas iela 22, LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
²Institute of Agricultural Resources and Economics, Zinātne iela 2, Priekuli, Priekuli municipality, LV-4126 Latvia
*Correspondence: zanda.kruma@llu.lv

Abstract:

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) contain a wide range of compounds with health benefits, and different techniques have been developed for the determination of these compounds. Freeze-drying is a common method for the preservation and preparation of samples for the analyses of bioactive compounds, but it is well known that drying influences the composition of food products. The aim of the current study was to compare phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of fresh and freeze-dried potatoes. In the experiment 11 cultivar potatoes grown in experimental fields of the Institute of Agricultural Resources and Economics in 2016 were analysed. Potatoes were freeze-dried. Homogenized fresh and freeze-dried samples were extracted with an ethanol/water (80/20 w/w) solution. Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the antioxidant activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH˙) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assays. The highest TPC and radical scavenging activity were determined in cultivars ‘Peru Purple’ and ‘Blue Congo’ potatoes. Freeze-drying influenced all the tested parameters but more significantly the TPC, and for certain cultivars a reduction of more than 30% was observed. A strong correlation between TPC, DPPH and ABTS in fresh and freeze-dried samples was observed, r = 0.81, r=0.93, r = 0.92, respectively. It could be concluded that the effect of freeze-drying on TPC and antioxidant activity is cultivar dependent.

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1331-1340 I. Beitane, G. Krumina–Zemture and M. Sabovics
Effect of germination and extrusion on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of raw buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)
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Effect of germination and extrusion on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of raw buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)

I. Beitane¹*, G. Krumina–Zemture¹ and M. Sabovics²

¹Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Nutrition, Riga Street 22, LV–3004 Jelgava, Latvia
²Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Food Technology, Riga street 22, LV–3004 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: ilze.beitane@llu.lv

Abstract:

The aim of the research was to determine the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds in raw and germinated common buckwheat grain and their extruded products in order to estimate the effect of germination and extrusion on the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds in buckwheat. A total of 10 buckwheat samples were analysed, where the raw buckwheat grain was the control sample, four samples were germinated and then extruded. The total phenolic content was determined using the Folin–Ciocalteu assay. The antioxidant activity was determined using a micro plate assay and phenolic compounds with Liquid Chromatography –Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer method.
The results showed that germination of buckwheat significantly affected the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, radical scavenging activity and content of phenolic compounds. The decrease of the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, radical scavenging activity and the content of some phenolic compounds depended on germination time – 48 h of germination provided greater concentrations at the end of a 24 h germination period, whereas the content of some phenolic compounds like rutin, quercetin and vitexin increased substantially after germination, besides, the increase of phenolic compounds depended on the germination time. In total 26 different phenolic compounds were detected in raw and germinated buckwheat samples and only one compound with an m/z value 385.1282 was unidentified. The data of extrusion revealed a significant decrease of total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, radical scavenging activity and phenolic compounds content in buckwheat samples (P < 0.05). In the extruded buckwheat samples novel phenolic compounds like 4–hydroxybenzoic acid, homovanillic acid, catechin, ferulic acid, and hyperoside were detected.

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1276–1286 N. Dubrovskaya, O. Savkina, L. Kuznetsova and O. Parakhina
Development of gluten-free bread with unconventional raw ingredients of high nutritional value and antimicrobial activity
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Development of gluten-free bread with unconventional raw ingredients of high nutritional value and antimicrobial activity

N. Dubrovskaya¹*, O. Savkina², L. Kuznetsova² and O. Parakhina³

¹Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya, 29,
195251, St.Petersburg, Russia, Russian Federation,
²Institute of Refrigeration and Biotechnologies, ITMO University, Lomonosova street,
9, 191002, St.Petersburg, Russia, Russian Federation
³St.Petersburg branch State Research Institute of Baking Industry, Podbelskogo
highway 7, 196608, St.Petersburg, Pushkin, Russia, Russian Federation
*Correspondence: dubrovskaja_nata@mail.ru

Abstract:

Two types of rowan powder (botanical species Sorbus aucuparia) as unconventional
raw ingredients of high nutritional and biological value as well as three types of dietary fiber
and pectin were used in development of gluten-free bread. These raw ingredients have high
water-holding capacity and a rich biochemical composition that makes it possible to use them
not only as thickeners and structure forming agents, but also as enriching additives. It was
experimentally found that the citrus fiber and pectin improved the bread specific volume and
the crumb compressibility if compared to the control sample. The content of vitamins A, E, PP,
C, B complex, minerals – iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, selenium, organic acids,
including preservatives rendering action (citric, lactic, sorbic, benzoic) were found in rowan
powder. It was found that rowan powder and citrus fiber had a significant effect on the increase
in the content of dietary fiber in 2.5–5.4 fold and iron in 2–3.5 fold. The content of dietary fiber
in bread with 4% of rowan fruit powder is 3.6 g 100g-1 while in bread with 8% rowan pomace it
is 4.3 g 100g-1, which corresponds to the dietary fiber daily needs satisfaction respectively by
10.0% and 21.5%. It was found that bread with rowanberry powder had 66.7% more watersoluble
antioxidants. The contamination of the main gluten-free raw material (soy protein, rice
flour and corn starch extrusion and corn, rowan powder) and its influence on ropy disease of
gluten free bread were established. Four spore forming bacteria strains were isolated from
gluten-free raw materials and its ability to cause ropy disease of gluten free bread was proved. It
was also found that using of rowan powder slow down ropy disease and mold spoilage due to
the organic acids in its composition and the bread acidity increase.

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1316–1329 L. Klavins, J. Kviesis, M. Klavins
Comparison of methods of extraction of phenolic compounds from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) press residues
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Comparison of methods of extraction of phenolic compounds from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) press residues

L. Klavins, J. Kviesis, M. Klavins*

University of Latvia, 19 Raina Blvd., LV–1586, Riga, Latvia
*Correspondence: maris.klavins@lu.lv

Abstract:

American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) contain significant quantities of
various phenolic compounds. Most of these compounds are recovered when berry juice is
produced. However, a considerable part of polyphenols remain in berry press residues and are
discarded as food industry waste. The aim of the study was to compare the methods of extraction
of polyphenols (ultrasound, microwave-assisted, Soxhlet) from press residues of American
cranberry. The impact of main extraction parameters (e.g., extraction time, solid/solvent ratio,
solvent type) on the yield of extracted polyphenols. Ultrasound-assisted extraction showed the
highest potential from all studied methods, given its fast, convenient use and low cost. Aqueous
ethanol and methanol in the presence of acid (anthocyanin extractions should be assisted with
trifluoroacetic acid, polyphenol extractions – with HCl) were assessed as the best solvents for
extraction. The obtained extracts were characterised using the Folin-Ciocaulteu method for
determination of total phenolics and the pH-differential method for determination of total
anthocyanins, and UPLC–PDA was used to determine the content of individual anthocyanins.
Cyanidin-3-O-arabinoside, peonidin-3-O-galactoside, peonidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-
O-arabinoside were identified as the main anthocyanins in cranberry press residue extracts.

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1284–1298 T. Evstigneeva, N. Skvortsova and R. Yakovleva
The application of green tea Extract as a source of antioxidants in the processing of dairy products
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The application of green tea Extract as a source of antioxidants in the processing of dairy products

T. Evstigneeva*, N. Skvortsova and R. Yakovleva

International Research Centre Biotechnologies of the Third Millennium ITMO University, St. Lomonosov 9, 191002, Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation
*Correspondence: romihka@mail.ru

Abstract:

 Regular consumption of foods containing antioxidants reduces the bodily content of free oxygen radicals, which can cause pathological changes and premature organism aging. The aim of this work was the development of the formulations and determination of the parameters for the production of cottage cheese products with polyphenol fraction of green tea extract as a source of plant antioxidants. Parameters to obtain extracts with the high content of extracted substances and high antioxidant activity were determined. Optimal performance was achieved by brewing dry green tea leaves with (70 ± 2) °C water, followed by steeping at the same temperature for 10 minutes with continuous mechanical stirring. Optimal dry tea leaves to water ratio used for tea extracts’ preparation was identified. The level of tea extract in cottage cheese products’ recipes was determined. The flavour fillers which combine the best with green tea extract and taste were identified. The positive effect of tea extract component on shelf life of cottage cheese product was shown.

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761-767 A. Urbonavičiūtė, G. Samuolienė, S. Sakalauskienė, A. Brazaitytė,J. Jankauskienė, P. Duchovskis, V. Ruzgas,A. Stonkus, P. Vitta, A. Žukauskas and G. Tamulaitis
Effect of flashing amber light on the nutritional quality of green sprouts
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Effect of flashing amber light on the nutritional quality of green sprouts

A. Urbonavičiūtė¹, G. Samuolienė¹, S. Sakalauskienė¹, A. Brazaitytė¹,J. Jankauskienė¹, P. Duchovskis¹, V. Ruzgas³,A. Stonkus², P. Vitta², A. Žukauskas² and G. Tamulaitis²

¹Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, 30 Kaunas str., LT–54333, Babtai, Kaunas distr.,Lithuania. Tel. +370–37–555476, fax: +370–37–555176; e-mail: a.urbonaviciute@lsdi.lt
²Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University,Saulėtekio al. 9–III, LT–10222 Vilnius, Lithuania
³Lithuanian University of Agriculture, Studentų g. 11, LT–53361 Akademija,Kaunas distr., Lithuania

Abstract:

We report on the application of flashing amber (596 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), supplemental to high pressure sodium lamps, for the cultivation of green sprouts, such as wheatgrass, barley grass, and leafy radish. The flashing light was found to significantly affect metabolism, thus conditioning the nutritional quality of the sprouts. In particular, it causes stressful conditions for the plants and within a short growth period can promote the synthesis of antioxidative compounds, such as vitamin C, phenolic compounds and carotenoids. However, the flashing amber light effect is dependent on the plant species.

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