Tag Archives: bio-SNG

754–767 T. Horschig, E. Billig and D. Thrän,
Model-based estimation of market potential for Bio-SNG in the German biomethane market until 2030 within a system dynamics approach
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Model-based estimation of market potential for Bio-SNG in the German biomethane market until 2030 within a system dynamics approach

T. Horschig¹*, E. Billig² and D. Thrän¹,²

¹DBFZ – Deutsches BiomasseForschungszentrum gGmbH, Department of Bioenergysystems, Torgauer Straße 116, DE 04347 Leipzig, Germany
²UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Bioenergysystems, Permoserstraße 15, DE 04347 Leipzig, Germany
*Correspondence: thomas.horschig@dbfz.de

Abstract:

 One option for energy provision from renewables is the production and grid injection of synthetic natural gas from lignin-rich biomass like wood and straw. Bio-SNG (biological produced synthetic/substitute natural gas) is the product of the thermochemical production of methane via gasification and methanation of lignin-rich biomass. The first commercial bio-SNG plant went successfully into operation in the end of 2014, in Gothenburg (Sweden). Regarding the huge potential of lignin-rich biomass bio-SNG is expected to have a high potential for a sustainable and greenhouse gas reducing contribution in power, heat and fuel markets. Being a future technology with great advantages like storability and transportability within a gas grid but recently too high prices for market implementation, possible future market shares are uncertain because bio-SNG has to compete with anaerobic biomethane as well as fossil alternatives. With the combination of an extensive techno-economic evaluation for present and future costs of bio-SNG depending on the feedstock supply chain and economy of scale, Delphi-Survey and a quantitative market simulation we determined future market shares for biomethane and bio-SNG for Germany under varying scenarios like incentive schemes, economy of scale and feedstock prices. Results indicate that substantial governmental support in terms of either R&D effort to lower bio-SNG prices or direct subsidies for a further capacity development is necessary to achieve significant market shares for biogenic methane.

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367-372 M. Repele, M. Dudko, J. Rusanova, K. Valters and G. Bazbauers
Environmental aspects of substituting bio-synthetic natural gas for natural gas in the brick industry
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Environmental aspects of substituting bio-synthetic natural gas for natural gas in the brick industry

M. Repele*, M. Dudko, J. Rusanova, K. Valters and G. Bazbauers

Institute of Energy Systems and Environment, Riga Technical University,Kronvalda Boulevard ¹, Riga, LV¹0¹0, Latvia;*Correspondence: mara.repele@rtu.lv

Abstract:

Firing of bricks is an essential manufacturing process during which the bricks obtainall  the  necessary  properties.  Life  cycle  assessment  studies  show  that  this  process  is  also  themost  energy  intensive  in  the  brick  manufacturing  process  and  results  in  the  largestenvironmental impact. Usually kilns are fired with natural gas, therefore substitution of fossilfuel  with  a  renewable  energy  source  is  considered  one  of  the  most  effective  approaches  forreduction  of  environmental  impact.  Bio-synthetic  natural  gas  (bio-SNG)  is  one  of  the  mostfeasible  substitutes  for  natural  gas  and  therefore  the  aim  of  the  study  was  to  compare  theenvironmental impacts of those energy sources.Comparison  of  the  life  cycle  of  the  environmental  impact  of  natural  gas  and  bio-SNG  wascarried out using the GEMIS (Global Emission Model for Integrated Systems) database. Bothenergy  sources  were  compared  on  the  basis  of  the  life  cycle  of  CO²  emissions,  cumulatedenergy and material requirement, land use and employment effects.Results show that by replacing natural gas with bio-SNG, greenhouse gases could be reducedand employment increased. However, cumulated energy, material and land requirement is largerwhen bio-SNG is used instead of natural gas.

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