Tag Archives: biochemical composition

1096-1103 V. Strazdina,, V. Sterna, A. Jemeljanovs, I. Jansons and D. Ikauniece
Investigation of beaver meat obtained in Latvia
Abstract |
Full text PDF (301 kB)

Investigation of beaver meat obtained in Latvia

V. Strazdina¹,*, V. Sterna², A. Jemeljanovs³, I. Jansons¹ and D. Ikauniece¹

¹Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment BIOR, Instituta street 1, Siguldas nov., Latvia, LV 2150; *Correspondence: vitastrazdina@inbox.lv 2Department of Agro–ecological Research, State Stende Cereals Breeding Institute, ‘Dižzemes’, Dižstende, Lībagi parish, Talsi County, Latvia 3Faculty of Veterinary medicine, Latvia University of Agriculture, K. Helmaņa street 8, Jelgava, Latvia, LV 3004

Abstract:

There is a high interest on the part of consumers to obtain meat from animals which have been reared as close to natural conditions as possible. Game meat, characterised by high nutritional value and specific organoleptic qualities, complies also to this claim. Game animals, including beaver, meat provide an excellent investment, diversification of many consumer meals. The meat of wild animals is more favourable for human health because it has lower saturated fatty acids. Investigations about biochemical composition of beaver meat are not very common worldwide. The aim of study was evaluate biochemical composition of beaver meat hunted in Latvia. Therefore protein, amino acids, fat, ash, cholesterol content and fatty acid composition of beaver meat samples were done. Conclusion was made that beaver meat samples protein content was 20.07–22.68% and fat content 3.31–5.27%. The sum of essential amino acids in beaver meet samples was determined from 0.99 mg 100 g-1, less than other game meat. While the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in meat samples of beaver (42.54%) was significantly higher than content of saturated (26.80%) or monounsaturated (27.42%) fatty acids. Ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids n–6 : n–3 in beaver meat samples were 1.26, PUFA : SFA in beaver meat samples were 1.60 and cholesterol content 49.51 mg 100 g-1 was lower in comparison of domestic or wild animals meat. From this point of view beaver meat is very healthy source of fat.

Key words:

, , ,




662-667 D. Matt, E. Veromann and A. Luik
Effect of housing systems on biochemical composition of chicken eggs
Abstract |
Full text PDF (156 kB)

Effect of housing systems on biochemical composition of chicken eggs

D. Matt, E. Veromann and A. Luik

Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences,Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51014 Tartu, Estonia; tel: +372 7425 010; e-mail: darja.matt@emu.ee

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of production system (organic, conventional) on the quality of chicken eggs. Energetic value, carbohydrate, cholesterol, protein, fatty acid, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, dry matter and vitamin contents were evaluated. The mean content of cholesterol was 30%, and potassium 7%, greater in the organic eggs compared with the conventional eggs. No significant difference was found in the content of fatty acids, protein, sodium or dry matter. The organic eggs had considerably lower contents of calcium (2.8 times) compared with eggs from conventional farming. Negligible differences were found in the occurrence of vitamins (vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D3). The residues of 45 pesticides and 6 PCB isomers were analyzed in both types of eggs and no residues compounds were found.

Key words:

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




737-743 A. Sasnauskas, V. Trajkovski, S. Strautina, O. Tikhonova, T. Šikšnianas,M. Rubinskiene, P. Viškelis, J. Lanauskas, A. Valiuškaitė,R. Rugienius and Č. Bobinas
Evaluation of blackcurrant cultivars and perspective hybrids in Lithuania
Abstract |
Full text PDF (210 kB)

Evaluation of blackcurrant cultivars and perspective hybrids in Lithuania

A. Sasnauskas¹, V. Trajkovski², S. Strautina³, O. Tikhonova⁴, T. Šikšnianas¹,M. Rubinskiene¹, P. Viškelis¹, J. Lanauskas¹, A. Valiuškaitė¹,R. Rugienius¹ and Č. Bobinas¹

¹Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Kauno 30, Babtai, Kaunas district, LT-54333, Lithuania
²Swedish Pomological Science Centre, Stubbaröd 2818, S-26023 Kågeröd, Sweden
³ Latvia State Institute of Fruit-Growing, Graudu 1, Dobele, LV-3701, Latvia
⁴N.I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry, 42-44 B. Morskaya Str, 190000, St. Petersburg, Russia

Abstract:

A cooperative blackcurrant breeding project between Sweden, Russia, Latvia and Lithuania studied yield, resistance to fungal diseases and pest, biochemical composition of berries of 20 new blackcurrant cultivars and hybrids at the Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture in 2004-2008. The blackcurrants were cultivated without plant protection against either diseases or pests. Yield, damage by fungal diseases and pest and biochemical composition was investigated. The hybrids BRi 9504-5, BRi 9568-1A, BRi 9508-3A and BRi 9508-3B were selected as possible cultivars.

Key words:

, , , , , ,