Tag Archives: biomass production

xxx S. Lamptey, S. Yeboah L. Li and R. Zhang
Dry matter accumulation and nitrogen concentration in forage and grain maize in dryland areas under different soil amendments
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Dry matter accumulation and nitrogen concentration in forage and grain maize in dryland areas under different soil amendments

S. Lamptey¹²⁴*, S. Yeboah¹³⁵ L. Li¹² and R. Zhang¹³

¹Gansu Provincial Key Lab of Arid Land Crop Science, Lanzhou CN730070, China
²College of Agronomy, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou CN730070, China
³College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou CN730070, China
⁴University for Development Studies, P.O Box TL 1882, Tamale–Ghana
⁵CSIR–Crops Research Institute, P.O Box 3785, Kumasi, Ghana
*Correspondence: naalamp2009@yahoo.com

Abstract:

Soil amendment plays significant role in improving soil fertility and increasing crop productivity in rain–fed agriculture. Understanding the grain yield associated with dry matter and N concentration is essential for improving maize production. A 3– year field study was conducted to determine dry matter accumulation, nitrogen concentration and grain yield of forage and grain maize under different soil amendments in the Western Loess Plateau of China. The experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and three replicates per treatment. Results showed that dry matter accumulation and nitrogen concentration in the swine manure in combination with chemical fertilized (SC) crops was significantly higher (by ≈ 60% and 39%) than no amendment (NA) which therefore translated into increased grain yield ≈ 74%. The SC treatment also improved leaf area index and chlorophyll content (P < 0.05) by approximately 34% to 32% compared to NA, which supported the above results. The nitrogen concentration in the leaf was higher at jointing and lower at maturity. Grain yield positively correlated with dry matter accumulation and nitrogen concentration at jointing, flowering and milk stage. Dry matter accumulation and grain yield also increased in the sole swine manure (SM) and maize stover (MS) treatments, but to lesser extent than SC. Based on the improvement of dry matter accumulation, nitrogen concentration and grain yield, swine manure in combination with chemical fertilizer appears to be a better fertilization option under dryland cropping systems.

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1494-1504 O. Szabó, G. Kovács and B. Heil
Effects of nutrient supply and planting material quality on yield and survival rate of a short rotation coppice culture in Hungary
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Effects of nutrient supply and planting material quality on yield and survival rate of a short rotation coppice culture in Hungary

O. Szabó*, G. Kovács and B. Heil

Institute of Environmental and Earth Science, Faculty of Forestry, University of West–Hungary, Bajcsy–Zs. Street 4, H–9400 Sopron, Hungary
*Correspondence: szabo.orsolya@emk.nyme.hu, orsoy@freemail.hu

Abstract:

In May 2011, a short rotation woody energy plantation (SRC) was established near Dejtár village in Northern–Hungary. The goal of the experiment was comparative analyses of different fertilization treatments on three clones of Populus (AF2, Monviso, Pannonia) and one Salix cultivar (‘Dékány’). We used three fertilization treatments: (1) 5 t ha–1 of wood ash, (2) 40 t ha–1 of farmyard manure and (3) both 5 t ha–1 of wood ash and 40 t ha–1 of farmyard manure. The Monviso clone had the highest survival rate (92%), followed by Pannonia (80%) and AF2 (78%). Initially, the white willow ‘Dékány’ cultivar was also included in the experiment, but due to differing site preferences of this cultivar, it was not viable in the area. Based on the data of the first three growing seasons, it was demonstrated that the important nutrients had already been present in optimal amounts from the start of the experiment, and their contents were increased due to the treatments. At the end of the first growing season, the effect of the fertilization treatment could not be detected, but by the third year the results showed a significant positive effect. Already in the second, but mostly at the end of the third growing season, the wood ash + manure fertilizer treated plots showed significant increases in height growth and biomass yield.

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305-314 D. Lazdina, A. Bardule, A. Lazdins and J. Stola
Use of waste water sludge and wood ash as fertiliser for Salix cultivation in acid peat soils
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Use of waste water sludge and wood ash as fertiliser for Salix cultivation in acid peat soils

D. Lazdina, A. Bardule, A. Lazdins and J. Stola

‘Silava’ Latvian State Forest Research Institute, Riga iela 111, Salaspils, LV–2169, Latvia; e-mail: dagnija.lazdina@silava.lv

Abstract:

Two problems have become more topical in recent years – production of solid biofuel from wood and the utilisation of ash and organic waste, including waste water sludge. The purpose of this research is to model simultaneous solutions for both of these problems through their use as fertilizer and to identify useful indications for the use of waste water sludge and wood ash as fertilisers. Opportunities to boost the efficiency of the applications of waste water sludge by combined spreading with wood ash are addressed in this study. An experiment is carried out in vegetation pots with different proportions of peat, sludge and ash to determine the impact of stem and root system development related to chemical and nutrient availability. Due to these studies, it is determined that waste water sludge has a comparably small liming effect. The fertilising effect of sludge can be increased by the admixture of wood ash and dolomite. These materials reduce the acidity of the soil and provide additional nutrients. Using dolomite as a liming material in the amount of 10 t ha-1 secures a change in pH of 0.6–1.2 units in peat soil. Significant changes in pH were found just a few centimetres into the upper layer of the soil. The application of an equal amount of wood ash produces a faster effect in terms of neutralisation. The limiting element is phosphorus. However, the mineralisation of peat increases the percentile proportion of all mineral elements in substrates as well as heavy metals.

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