Tag Archives: cattle manure

xxx K. Meiramkulova, A. Bayanov, T. Ivanova, B. Havrland, J. Kára and I. Hanzlíková
Effect of different compositions on anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure and agro-industrial by-products
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Effect of different compositions on anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure and agro-industrial by-products

K. Meiramkulova¹, A. Bayanov¹, T. Ivanova²*, B. Havrland², J. Kára³ and I. Hanzlíková³

¹L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Department of Management and Engineering in the Field of Environmental Protection, Satpayev str., KZ010008 Astana, Kazakhstan
²Czech University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Department of Sustainable Technologies, Kamýcká 129, CZ16500 Prague, Czech Republic
³Research Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Drnovská 507, CZ16101 Prague, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: ivanova@ftz.czu.cz

Abstract:

The present research is dedicated to the study of anaerobic co-digestion process of different biomass materials. Anaerobic co-digestion of digested sludge, grass silage, haylage and cattle manure was evaluated in mesophilic tank reactors in the lab-scale experiment. Twelve laboratory scale tank reactors (1.5 L) were used during the incubation period of 45 days. First triplet of reactors was fed with pure digested sludge and the other three with different mixtures having the volumetric ratios of 30/35/25/10, 40/30/20/10 and 50/25/15/10 for digested sludge/corn silage/grass haylage/cattle manure. Methane production was analyzed for all lab-scale reactors individually. The resulting specific methane production of above-mentioned batches was 336.34, 238.1 and 233.23 LSTP[CH4] kg-1[TVS], respectively. Other results such as cumulative biogas and methane yield, volumetric biogas and methane yield, volumetric biogas and methane yield per day were also assessed. These results had the highest meaning when complex substrate had no more than 30% of inoculum.

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915–920 R. Uvarov, A. Briukhanov, I. Subbotin and E. Shalavina
Disinfection of solid fraction of cattle manure in drum-type bio-fermenter
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Disinfection of solid fraction of cattle manure in drum-type bio-fermenter

R. Uvarov*, A. Briukhanov, I. Subbotin and E. Shalavina

Institute for Engineering and Environmental Problems in Agricultural Production (IEEP), Filtrovskoye sh., 3, Tyarlevo, g. RU196625 Sankt-Peterburg, Russia
*Correspondence: rauvarov@gmail.com

Abstract:

In the context of increased intensification of production and disruption of established ties between livestock and crop farms there is an urgent need to introduce novel, more efficient, economically viable and environmentally sound techniques of animal and poultry manure processing. As a part of the ongoing work on implementation of best available techniques (BAT) in various sectors of Russian economy, agriculture included, the bioconversion technology of organic waste in a drum-type bio-fermenter was considered as one of BAT candidates, which is most adapted to the natural and climatic conditions of North-West Russia and feature the minimal environmental impact. The main purpose was to investigate the influence of bioconversion of solid fraction of cattle manure on selected microbial parameters and parasitic purity in the raw material, semi-finished and final products. The study was conducted in the IEEP Organic Waste Bioconversion Laboratory on a patented drum-type bio-fermenter. After 18 hours the digested material self-heated to 55 °C, i.e. the lower limit of the range of thermophilic microbial activity. By the 30th hour after the experiment started the temperature had reached the maximum level of 71 °C, then it dropped to 62–66 °C and stabilized in this range. 48 hours after the temperature reached 55 °C, the content of coliform bacteria reduced to acceptable limits, and that of Enterococcus dropped more than 10 times. After 120 hours the digested product was completely disinfected.

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420-429 V. Skorupskaitė, V. Makarevičienė,, G. Šiaudinis and V. Zajančauskaitė
Green energy from different feedstock processed under anaerobic conditions
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Green energy from different feedstock processed under anaerobic conditions

V. Skorupskaitė¹, V. Makarevičienė¹,*, G. Šiaudinis² and V. Zajančauskaitė³

¹Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Studentų Str. 11, LT53361 Akademija, Kauno district, Lithuania; *Correspondence: virginija.skorupskaite@asu.lt
²Vėžaičiai Branch of Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Gargždų str. 29, LT96216 Vezaiciai, Klaipėda district, Lithuania
³Klaipėda University, Faculty of Marine Technology, Department of technological process. Herkaus Manto Str. 84, LT92294 Klaipėda, Lithuania

Abstract:

The possible use of energy crops and aquaculture for bioenergy production has only recently become a research target, so there is little information on their properties and advantages. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible use of cup plant, as well as marine and freshwater algae (Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp.) for biogas production. Research of a batch anaerobic digestion process at a mesophilic temperature were performed using wet wastewater sludge, cattle manure, fresh microalgae biomass and dry marine algae, cup plant biomass and mixtures of these materials. The highest biogas yield (541.28 ml g-1 VS) was obtained by using a new feedstock from the microalgae Scenedesmus sp. biomass. That yield was 1.4 times higher than the biogas yield from cattle manure and 15% lower than the biogas yield from wastewater sludge. It was found that adding microalgae biomass to a cattle manure substrate increases biogas production approx. 1.5 times. The highest methane concentration in biogas produced from microalgae ranges from 64.87% to 66.66% and exceeds the methane amount (64.26%) in biogas produced from wastewater sludge. The methane amount in biogas produced from cattle manure, cup plant and marine algae biomass is lower than 60%. In addition, it was found that it is possible to produce 5,092.3 m3 of biogas or 113 GJ of energy from 1 ha of harvested cup plant biomass.

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