Tag Archives: cover crop

033–043 A. Bender
Impact of the seeding and nitrogen fertilizer rates of spring wheat that is used as a cover crop on the yielding ability of tetraploid red clover stand established at different seeding rates
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Impact of the seeding and nitrogen fertilizer rates of spring wheat that is used as a cover crop on the yielding ability of tetraploid red clover stand established at different seeding rates

A. Bender

Estonian Crop Research Institute, Aamisepa 1, EE 48 309 Jõgeva, Estonia
e-mail: ants.bender@etki.ee

Abstract:

In the years 2013–2014, a field trial was conducted at the Estonian Crop Research Institute in order to investigate a possibility of using spring wheat as a cover crop in the establishment of red clover seed field. In the trial the cover crop had four different seeding and fertilization rates. Two tetraploid red clover cultivars, ‘Varte’ (early) and ‘Ilte’ (late), were seeded at rates 2, 4, 6 and 8 kg PLS per hectare in four replications. In the year of sowing the height and density of generative tillers of spring wheat, the grain yield and its quality, the number of red clover plants per m², and the seed yield of red clover and its quality in the 1st year of harvest were determined. Economic feasibility was calculated based on the prices valid at the time of trial conduction. The trial confirmed that while establishing a red clover seed field, it is possible to replace the earlier recommended six-rowed early barley cultivars with early spring wheat cultivars. It is expedient to reduce the seeding rate and nitrogen fertilizer rate of cover crop by one third. The optimum seeding rate of tetraploid red clover cultivars was 4–6 kg PLS ha-1.

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532-535 T. Univer, K. Põrk and N. Univer
Living grass mulches in strawberry cultivation
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Living grass mulches in strawberry cultivation

T. Univer, K. Põrk and N. Univer

Polli Horticultural Research Centre of the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciencesof Estonian University of Life Sciences, Polli, 69108, Viljandimaa, Estonia;e-mail: toivo.univer@emu.ee

Abstract:

Strawberries grow best on soils with high organic matter content and high fertility levels. Green manure crops were used successfully as a substitute for farm manure. Another opportunity to increase organic matter content of soil is to grow groundcover crops, for example grass species, between strawberry rows. Proper management can reduce weeds, erosion on slopes, soil compaction, dust and mud. Potential disadvantages of using cover crops between rows include the consumption of nitrogen and other nutrients as well as water. The aim of this research was to elucidate the impact of various living mulches on plant vegetative growth and yield of cv. ‘Bounty’. Different living mulches were evaluated at the Polli Horticultural Research Centre during 2001–2003. The following living mulches were compared: natural grass cover, red fescue, Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, timothy, orchardgrass, and white clover.

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