Tag Archives: dry matter yield

198–210 S. Rancane, A. Karklins, D. Lazdina, P. Berzins, A. Bardule, A. Butlers and A. Lazdins
The evaluation of biomass yield and quality of Phalaris arundinacea and Festulolium fertilised with bio-energy waste products
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The evaluation of biomass yield and quality of Phalaris arundinacea and Festulolium fertilised with bio-energy waste products

S. Rancane¹*, A. Karklins², D. Lazdina³, P. Berzins¹, A. Bardule³, A. Butlers³ and A. Lazdins³

¹Latvia University of Agriculture, Institute of Agriculture, Lielā iela 2, LV-3001,
Jelgava, Latvia
²Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Soil and Plant
Sciences, Lielā iela 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
³Latvia State Forest Research Institute ‘Silava’, Rīgas iela 111, LV-2169 Salaspils,
Latvia
*Correspondence: sarmite.rancane@inbox.lv

Abstract:

 Tall growing perennial grasses such as Phalaris arundinacea and Festulolium can be used as an alternative source for bioenergy production in northern latitudes as they can be grown in less cultivated areas and can be potentially used as a dual purpose crop (bioenergy and forage). The aim of studies was to investigate the effectiveness of using bioenergy waste products – fermentation residues (digestate) and wood ash as fertilisers for perennial grasses. The field experiment was conducted in the central part of Latvia (56°42′ N and 25°08′ E) from 2013 to 2015. For all fertiliser treatments (wood ash, digestate once per season; digestate twice per season and mineral fertilisers) the same amount of plant nutrients (N, P, K) was applied annually: N (100), P2O5 (80), K2O (160); and the missing quantities of elements in ash and digestate were compensated by mineral fertilisers. Dry matter yield (DMY) in two harvest regimes (single cut and two cut) and chemical composition (ash content; total C and N) of grass biomass partitioning among tillers, leaves and panicles were estimated.
Biomass yield in the three years of use varied considerably depending on the fertiliser, harvest regime and species, ranging up to 10.0 Mg ha-1 for RCG and 7.73 Mg ha-1 for festulolium. All fertilisers provided a significant increase of DMY, however, better results for both species were obtained using wood ash and mineral fertilisers. The harvest regime and species affected directly the quality of biomass, single cut of RCG contained significantly less ash and more carbon. There were significant differences between sward fractions – culms in comparison with leaves contained less ash and nitrogen, and more carbon, what are desirable features for solid fuel.

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523-530 A. Bender, S. Tamm
Estonian natural lucerne populations: yield ability and quality
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Estonian natural lucerne populations: yield ability and quality

A. Bender, S. Tamm

Jõgeva Plant Breeding Institute 48 309 Jõgeva, Estonia;
e-mail: ants.bender@jpbi.ee

Abstract:

With seeds collected in 2001–2002 from semi natural grasslands of Estonia, plot trials were established in 2003 in order to determine the ability of lucerne populations, their suitability for breeding purposes and prospective ways of use. In the sum of dry matter yields of the sowing year and three years of use, one natural population (Reigi) exceeded the standard variety by 6.0%, but in the crude protein yield it was within the experimental error inferior to the standard. From plant breeding perspective this population is of interest. However, it must be checked whether the location where seeds were collected was not a former sowing place of some existing foreign variety. The rest of the test ed populations can be divided into two groups based on their growth rhythm and dry matter yield: 1) with modest regrowth, predominantly yellow-flowered forms of Medicago falcata L. type spreading by rhizomes deserve attention as initial material for breeding of specific varieties for landscape management. Particular longevity of the variety and low management costs are highly valued, but the biochemical composition of the yield (dry matter and crude protein yields account for 48.0–55.7% and 49.6–59.2% respectively, compared to the standard variety) is of minor importance, 2) yellow- and multicolour-flowered populations of M. media Pers., which dry matter and crude protein yields ranged between 65.8–92.0% and 64.5–86.2% respective ly, in comparison with standard variety. The seeds of these populations can successfully be used for improvement of semi-natural grasslands on drought-sensitive light soils with neutral or alkaline reaction that are suitable for lucerne growth. Their advantage is winter hardiness , grazing resistance and longevity, and that is worth of considering while choosing initial material for breeding.

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684-690 A. Nykänen, L. Jauhiainen and M. Rinne
Biomass production and feeding value of whole-crop cereal-legume silages
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Biomass production and feeding value of whole-crop cereal-legume silages

A. Nykänen¹, L. Jauhiainen² and M. Rinne³

¹ MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Plant Production Research, Lönnrotinkatu 3, FIN-50100Mikkeli, Finland; e-mail: arja.nykanen@mtt.fi
² MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Method Services, FIN-31600 Jokioinen, Finland
³ MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Animal Production Research, FIN-31600 Jokioinen, Finland

Abstract:

In eastern Finland, 12 mixtures of spring wheat, spring barley, spring oats and/or rye with vetches and/or peas  were evaluated in  field experiments from 2005 to 2007 for their dry matter (DM) production, crude protein (CP) concentration and digestibility using three different harvesting  times.  Spring  wheat-pea  and  spring  wheat-vetch-rye  mixtures  produced  the  highest DM  yields  (5,000–6,000  kg  ha-1)  while  the  lowest  yields  were  found  with  spring  oats-vetch (4,000 kg ha-1 DM). The highest CP concentrations were found in vetches (200 g kg-1 DM) and lowest in  spring cereals (90–120 g kg-1  DM). Organic  matter digestibility  was  highest in peas (700–750  g  kg-1)  and  lowest  in  spring  rye  and  wheat  (550–610  g  kg-1).  It  is  suggested  that decisions concerning when to harvest legume-cereal mixtures for forage could be based on the maturity stage of the cereal, because changes in digestibility and CP concentration are slow in legumes during the potential harvesting period.  Key words: barley, dry matter yield, forage digestibility, oats, pea, rye, vetch, wheatINTRODUCTION

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