Tag Archives: economic analysis.

xxx B. Bernardi, J. Tous, S. Benalia, L.M. Abenavoli, G. Zimbalatti, T. Stillitano and A.I. De Luca
The assessment of hazelnut mechanical harvesting productivity
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The assessment of hazelnut mechanical harvesting productivity

B. Bernardi¹, J. Tous², S. Benalia¹*, L.M. Abenavoli¹, G. Zimbalatti¹, T. Stillitano¹ and A.I. De Luca¹

¹University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Department of Agraria, Feo di Vito IT89122 Reggio Calabria, Italy
²EMP Agrícola. Sant Antoni 26, ES43480 Vila-seca Tarragona, Spain
*Correspondence: soraya.benalia@unirc.it

Abstract:

Hazelnut cultivation represents a new opportunity for Calabrian mountainous and sloping areas (Southern Italy), where no alternative fruit crops, except forestry, could be settled. In this Region, hazelnut production doubled during the last fifty years, inciting the farmers to introduce mechanization in cropping practices such as harvesting in order to increase productivity and decrease production costs. Indeed, harvesting is currently one of the most expensive processes of the productive cycle, moreover to be time consuming if carried out manually. Mechanization degree depends significantly on the terrain topography: in sloping areas, rakes are often associated to aspirating machines to harvest the fallen fruit, while the employment of harvesting machines from the ground prevails in flat areas. In this context, the present paper aims to assess technical and economic aspects of harvesting operation, using a harvester from the ground model ‘Jolly 2800’ (GF s.r.l., Italy). Particularly, for technical purposes data about operational working time as well as working productivity were collected according to CIOSTA requirements, in two harvesting sites, whereas, for mechanical harvesting economic evaluation, an estimation model was applied to calculate machinery cost per hour. Moreover, the cost per kg of hazelnut in shell and the average cost per hectare were estimated also. The obtained results show a working productivity of 0.065 ha h-1 op-1 in the first harvesting site, while it was equal to 0.022 ha h-1 op-1 in the second one. Concerning the average cost per hectare, the second harvesting site showed the worst economic performances, with 550.76 € ha-1 against 182.54 € ha-1 obtained in the first one.

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328-336 M. Kolarikova, T. Ivanova,, P. Hutla and B. Havrland
Economic evaluation of hemp (Cannabis sativa) grown for energy purposes (briquettes) in the Czech Republic
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Economic evaluation of hemp (Cannabis sativa) grown for energy purposes (briquettes) in the Czech Republic

M. Kolarikova¹⋅², T. Ivanova¹,*, P. Hutla² and B. Havrland¹

¹Czech University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Tropics and Subtropics, Department of Sustainable Technologies, Kamycka 129, CZ16521 Prague 6, Czech Republic
²Research Institute of Agricultural Engineering, p.r.i., Drnovska 509, CZ16100 Prague 6, Czech Republic *Correspondence: ivanova@ftz.czu.cz

Abstract:

Depletion of fossil fuels and their environmental risks have brought to the foreground energy crops as a possible source of bioenergy. Industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been suggested for production of solid biofuels (briquettes) due to good physic-mechanical properties as well as positive energy and combustion characteristics. This study determined economic potential of hemp briquettes production in the Czech Republic. A field trial was conducted in 2009–2014 in Prague in order to compare biomass yield (BY) of hemp varieties Bialobrzeskie (B) and Ferimon (F) harvested in autumn and spring period. Based on obtained results this study determined production costs of hemp briquettes (CZK t-1), revenue (CZK t-1) and rate of return (%) for four scenarios (B, F harvested in autumn and B, F harvested in spring). Briquettes production costs ranged from 4,015 CZK t-1 to 4,707 CZK t-1 for B in spring and B in autumn, respectively, due to 30% lower biomass yield in spring harvest. Results indicated that hemp briquettes production was not profitable if the selling price was the same as the price of wood briquettes and with BY obtained in experiment (7.18–10.7 t ha-1 of dry matter). Briquettes production in autumn made profit of 9% for B and 7% for F when subsidies for hemp cultivation were considered. In current conditions in the Czech Republic, utilization of hemp for briquettes production did not prove to be economically feasible.

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7-12 L.M. Abenavoli and C. Marcianò
Technical and economic analysis of alternative pruning systems in high dimensions olive trees in Calabria
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Technical and economic analysis of alternative pruning systems in high dimensions olive trees in Calabria

L.M. Abenavoli and C. Marcianò

Agraria Department, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria, LocalitàFeo de Vito, 89126 Reggio Calabria, Italy;
*Correspondence: claudio.marciano@unirc.it

Abstract:

Oliviculture in Calabria accounts for 30% of the agricultural gross regionalproduction. On the Gioia Tauro plain, located in the province of Reggio Calabria, theoliviculture area is extended over more than 20,000 hectares. The olive trees in this area arecharacterised by a remarkable growth with trees reaching and often exceeding 25 metres inheight. In these extreme conditions all the cultural operations are technically and economicallycomplex. Particularly complex are the pruning operations, normally done with traditionalmethods, which are dangerous for the operators, who have to climb the trees to make the cutswith chain saws. The objective of this study is to encourage the use of mechanical systems,specifically truck-mounted telescopic platforms, to secure operators and lower the pruningcosts. They were therefore analysed two operating systems, the traditional and the mechanical,comparing the working capacity of different yards. The results have been encouraging althoughthe machines utilised can be rationally introduced only on large farms, while the small farmshave to rely on cooperatives of services or on contractors.

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