Tag Archives: economic value

1671-1683 A. Remmik, J. Härma and R. Värnik
Economic considerations for using sexed semen on Holstein cows and heifers in Estonia
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Economic considerations for using sexed semen on Holstein cows and heifers in Estonia

A. Remmik*, J. Härma and R. Värnik

Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Economics and Social Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51014 Tartu, Estonia
*Correspondence: aadi.remmik@student.emu.ee

Abstract:

The study investigated economic and managerial considerations for using sexed semen as a tool for accelerated herd expansion and improvement of its genetic potential. Economic value of reproduction strategies based on conventional semen and sexed semen were analysed according to partial budgeting method by Victor E Cabrera and adjusted for the Estonian average indicators. Data for the study were provided by Animal Breeders Association of Estonia. In order to evaluate the economic value of using sexed semen over conventional semen, five different reproductive strategies involving sexed semen were used and compared with conventional semen-based strategy. Average conception rate from the first insemination with conventional semen was 65.6% and 56.1% with sexed semen for Holstein heifers in Estonia in 2015. Probability for birth of a female calf was 49.3% with conventional semen and 93.0% with sexed semen. Net present value for all sexed semen based reproduction strategies was negative at the baseline conditions. Sensitivity analysis for key reproductive and economic variables showed that market price of female calves and conception rates had the most impact on the economic value. Sexed semen can be a valuable tool for reproduction management in dairy farms, but the actual economic value of its application depends on the reproductive performance and objectives of an individual farm. Results of this study provide basis for further research about the situations, where using sexed semen would be economically justified for the farmers.

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54-66 K. Kall, Ü. Roosmaa and R. Viiralt
Assessment of the economic value of cattle slurry and biogas digestate used on grassland
Abstract |
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Assessment of the economic value of cattle slurry and biogas digestate used on grassland

K. Kall¹*, Ü. Roosmaa¹ and R. Viiralt²

¹Institute of Economics and Social Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences,
Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51014 Tartu, Estonia
²Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life
Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 64, EE51014 Tartu, Estonia
*Correspondence: katri.kall@emu.ee

Abstract:

 Concentration of dairy production and development of manure handling technologies has led to large amounts of cattle slurry produced as a by-product. Slurry can be used directly for fertilisation or input for biogas production. As a result of added organic materials, the nutrient content of the by-product of anaerobic digestion (biogas digestate) differs from nutrient content of slurry. The data from the 2012 to 2014 field experiment designed to evaluate the use of local organic fertilisers on grassland were used for the current study. The objective of this research is to present an approach for the fair reflection of the economic value of organic fertilisers. The approach is based on substitution relationships between mineral and organic fertilisation on a certain yield level of grass dry matter production. The economic value was assessed based on the nutrient content of cattle slurry and biogas digestate, application costs, and the cost of mineral fertilisation. Two categories of economic value were calculated: the total and the actually realised value. The total economic value shows the potential value of nutrients available for plant production. The actual realised value is formed through the nutrient usage by plants. The economic value of the biogas digestate used in the experiments appeared to be higher than the value of slurry, due to the equal application of ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), the higher content of potassium and lower application rates.

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