Tag Archives: energy potential

656-668 A. Brunerová, H. Roubík, M. Brožek and J. Velebil
Agricultural residues in Indonesia and Vietnam and their potential for direct combustion: with a focus on fruit processing and plantation crops
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Agricultural residues in Indonesia and Vietnam and their potential for direct combustion: with a focus on fruit processing and plantation crops

A. Brunerová¹*, H. Roubík², M. Brožek¹ and J. Velebil³

¹Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Material Science and Manufacturing Technology, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
²Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Department of Sustainable Technologies, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
³Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Technological Equipment of Buildings, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: brunerova@tf.czu.cz

Abstract:

Energy consumption in Indonesia and Vietnam has grown rapidly in recent decades. To meet the energy needs of both countries, a higher utilisation of waste biomass sources may represent an adequate solution. Investigated samples represent major crop residues (waste biomass) originating mainly from the agriculture sector of the selected countries. Herbaceous waste biomass from Indonesia is, namely, cassava stems and root peelings (Manihot esculenta), coffee leaves (Coffea arabica), cacao leaves (Theobroma cacao), banana leaves (Musa acuminata), bamboo leaves (Bambusoideae spp.) and aloe vera leaves (Aloe vera). Furthermore, fruit and aquatic waste biomass originating from Vietnam is, specifically, sugarcane bagasse (Saccharum officinarum), durian peelings (Durio zibethinus), rambutan peelings (Nephelium lappaceum), banana peelings (Musa acuminata), water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). All mentioned types of waste biomass were subjected to proximate and calorimetric analysis: moisture, ash and volatile matter contents (%) and higher and lower heating values (MJ kg–1). Obtained values indicated the highest level of ash content in fruit biomass samples in the case of sugarcane bagasse (0.84%), in herbaceous biomass in the case of cassava stems (3.14%) and in aquatic biomass in the case of water hyacinth (14.16%). The highest levels of lower heating values were achieved by following samples (best samples from each biomass type): cassava stems (17.5 MJ kg–1); banana peelings (17.3 MJ kg–1) and water hyacinth (12.8 MJ kg–1). The overall evaluation of all observed samples indicated that the best suitability for energy utilisation by direct combustion of investigated representatives is fruit waste biomass, followed by herbaceous waste biomass and then aquatic waste biomass.

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229-239 A. Kryževičienė, A. Jasinskas and A. Gulbinas
Perennial grasses as a source of bioenergy in Lithuania
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Perennial grasses as a source of bioenergy in Lithuania

A. Kryževičienė¹, A. Jasinskas² and A. Gulbinas²

¹ Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture, Instituto al.1, LT-58344 Akademija,Kėdainiai reg., Lithuania; e-mail: akryzeviciene@lzi.lt
² Institute of Agricultural Engineering Lithuanian University of Agriculture,Raudondvaris, LT-54132 Kaunas reg., Lithuania; e-mail: aljas@mei.lt

Abstract:

The study was designed to investigate the feasibility of cultivating perennial grasses as energy crops and their effect on soil agroecological potential. Field experiments with different grasses were conducted at the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture from 2000–2004. Perennial grasses Phalaroides arundinacea L. and Bromopsis inermis Leysser were grown pure and in mixtures with legumes. Melilotus officinalis, Lupinus polyphyllus and Galega orientalis on a light gleyic loam soil (Cambisol) with a humus content of ca. to 2%. Pure swards of grasses were either fertilized with nitrogen or not. Mixtures did not receive any N. The swards were cut once per season when their biomass was used for combustion, and twice per season when their biomass was used for biogas. Dry matter yield of grasses in pure stands ranged from 6.4 to 9.3 t ha-1. Under normal weather conditions grass-legume mixtures without nitrogen (N) fertilization were higher yielding than N-fertilized (60+60 kg N ha-1) grass in pure swards, but the mixtures were lower yielding in the years with inadequate rainfall. In all cases mixtures had an important ecological advantage over N-fertilized grass swards. The swards had a positive soil conservation effect and maintained soil fertility potential.The energy potential of perennial grasses in both cases of biomass utilization variedaccording to DM yield variation and totaled up to 153 GJ ha-1; energy input for biofuel production amounted to 8.0 – 19.2 GJ ha-1. Our experimental evidence suggests that the tested swards sown on less fertile soil, amounting to over 0.5 million ha in Lithuania, would be able to produce to 4 million tons of biomass for energy production annually.

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