Tag Archives: hay

331-342 M. Luna-del Risco, A. Normak and K. Orupõld
Biochemical methane potential of different organic wastes and energy crops from Estonia
Abstract |

Biochemical methane potential of different organic wastes and energy crops from Estonia

M. Luna-del Risco¹, A. Normak¹ and K. Orupõld¹²

¹Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences. Kreutzwaldi 5, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
²Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences
e-mail: 1 mario.luna@emu.ee, 1 argo.normak@emu.ee, 1,2 kaja.orupold@emu.ee

Abstract:

 The biochemical methane potential (BMP) of different Estonian substrates as alternative sources for biogas production was studied. For this purpose, the BMP test was carried out in batch mode at mesophilic temperature (36°C). Substrates were divided into 2 groups: agricultural substrates (silage, hay, cattle and pig slurry) and food industry residues (milk, brewery and cereal industry residues). Methane yields obtained were between 286–319 L kgVS-1 for silage and hay, 238–317 L kgVS-1 for animal slurry and 272–714 L kgVS-1 for agro-industrial wastes. The highest methane yield was obtained from sour cream (714    L kgVS-1), the lowest (238 L kgVS-1) from cattle slurry. In overall, our results suggest that all tested substrates can be treated anaerobically and are potential sources for the production of methane.

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155-164 A. Menind and A. Normak
Study on Grinding Biomass as Pre-treatment for Biogasification
Abstract |
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Study on Grinding Biomass as Pre-treatment for Biogasification

A. Menind¹ and A. Normak²

¹ Institute of Technology, Estonian University of Life Sciences,
56 Kreutzwaldi Str., EE51014 Tartu, Estonia; e-mail: andres.menind@emu.ee
² Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,
Estonian University of Life Sciences, 5 Kreutzwaldi Str., EE51014 Tartu, Estonia

Abstract:

Six different samples were collected from local farms in Tartu County in Estonia. Based on preliminary results of fibre tests, four samples with different lignin content were chosen for grinding and biogasification experiments. Next, knife mill and laboratory scissors were used for particle size reduction. The knife mill was used with bottom screen sizes 0.5 mm, 4 mm and 10 mm. With scissors the hay was cut into 2…3 cm pieces. Sieve shaker and Easy Sieve software were used for particle distribution analysis. Biogas potential was determined for different hay samples. Cumulative biogas production was calculated by pressure increase in gas phase of bottles according to ideal gas law. We are going to show in what way the cutting impacts biogas yield. Negative correlation between biogas yield, particle size and lignin content is significant for most hay samples analysed.

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