Tag Archives: hop

859–865 A. Rybka, P. Heřmánek and I. Honzík
Theoretical analysis of the technological process of hop drying
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Theoretical analysis of the technological process of hop drying

A. Rybka*, P. Heřmánek and I. Honzík

Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Agricultural Machines, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00 Praha 6 – Suchdol, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: rybka@tf.czu.cz

Abstract:

This article is aimed at the current questions concerning hop drying, a process which represents a significant part of energy consumption for hop producers. The water content drops during hop cone drying from the original approx. 80% of moisture to 8 or 10%. The drying medium is heated air, and the maximum drying temperatures range between 55 °C and 60 °C, remaining practically stable for the entire duration of drying. Hops are exposed to these temperatures for 6 to 8 hours. The current old and ageing belt dryers record large losses. Their modernisation and particularly new drying technologies need to derive from perfect knowledge of thermal characteristics of materials and drying devices. The drying process and the actual implementation necessarily depend on the knowledge of the entire process calculation that is why the paper introduction outlines simplified issues concerning a ‘theoretical dryer’ following the hx chart. An experimental measurement was carried out in an operating belt dryer. It included measurements of the drying medium thermal and moisture parameters and of the drying hop qualitative parameters. These drying parameters were monitored by means of continuously recording data loggers and of a laboratory analysis of the samples (hop moisture content, alpha bitter acids, Hop Storage Index). The drying process revealed that hops are practically dry (10 ± 2.0% of moisture content) already at the end of the second belt or possibly at the beginning of the third belt. It was also proven that hops are excessively dried (moisture content of 4 to 8%), adjusted to their final moisture of 8–10% through conditioning. Excessive drying results in considerate hop-cone shatter which makes the hop manipulation difficult during further processing, leading to larger losses of lupulin.

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713–719 P. Heřmánek, A. Rybka and I. Honzík
Experimental chamber dryer for drying hops at low temperatures
Abstract |
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Experimental chamber dryer for drying hops at low temperatures

P. Heřmánek*, A. Rybka and I. Honzík

Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Agricultural Machines, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00 Praha 6 – Suchdol, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: hermanek@tf.czu.cz

Abstract:

Hop drying takes a significant part in growers’ costs of the final product processing. The current drying technology is based on drying at the drying air temperature of 55–60 °C for 6–9 hours to the final moisture content of about 10%. However, the process results in irreversible transformations and losses of, inter alia, heat labile substances contained in hops.
The experimental chamber dryer was tested at harvest in 2016. Assays hop drying were carried out at a temperature of the drying medium 40 °C. The research results in the form of an experimental new experimental chamber dryer will be used for testing of drying technologies at lower temperatures of the drying medium.
This is what will enable to preserve the quality of aroma as well as other characteristics of the components contained in hops.

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