Tag Archives: industrial hemp

xxx A. Adamovics, S. Ivanovs and V. Bulgakov
Investigations about the impact of the sowing time and rate of the biomass yield and quality of industrial hemp
Abstract |
Full text PDF (271 kB)

Investigations about the impact of the sowing time and rate of the biomass yield and quality of industrial hemp

A. Adamovics¹, S. Ivanovs¹* and V. Bulgakov²

¹Latvia University of Agriculture, 2, Liela str., Jelgava LV-3001, Latvia
²National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, 15, Heroyiv Obrony str., Kyiv UK 03041, Ukraine
*Correspondence: semjons@apollo.lv

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to find the optimum sowing rate of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) and to clarify the impact of the sowing rate on the production of biofuel from hemp biomass in Latvia. Field trials were carried out at the Research and Study Farm ‘Pēterlauki’ of the Latvia University of Agriculture in 2012–2014. The industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) ‘Futura 75’ was sown in a Luvic Endogleyic Stagnosol soil: pHKCl 6.7; P – 52 mg kg-1; K – 128 mg kg-1; the organic matter content – 21–25 g kg-1. Hemp was sown in 10-m2 plots, triplicate, on May 8 and 17. The total sowing rate was 20 (100), 30 (150), 40 (200), 50 (250), 60 (300), 70 (350), 80 (400), 90 (450), and 100 (500) kg ha-1 (germinating seeds per 1 m2). The plots were fertilised as follows: N – 120 kg ha-1; P2O5 – 80 kg ha-1; and K2O – 112 kg ha-1. Hemp was harvested when the first matured seeds appeared. The biometrical indices (height and stem diameter), harvesting time, the amount of fresh and dry biomass, and the fibre content were evaluated. Depending on the sowing rate, the yield of dry matter was on average 9.2–12.1 t ha-1 when hemp was sown at the beginning of May, and 7.9–10.0 t ha-1 when hemp was sown in the middle of May.

Key words:

, , ,




73-82 S. Ivanovs, A. Adamovics and A. Rucins
Investigation of the technological spring harvesting variants of the industrial hemp stalk mass
Abstract |
Full text PDF (432 kB)

Investigation of the technological spring harvesting variants of the industrial hemp stalk mass

S. Ivanovs*, A. Adamovics and A. Rucins

Latvia University of Agriculture, Ulbroka, LV-2130, Latvia
*Correspondence: semjons@apollo.lv

Abstract:

One of the simplest technological solutions of hemp harvesting applied in practice in Latvia and some other countries is harvesting of the hemp stalks in spring. Implementation of this technology does not require expensive specialised machinery. However, there are significant losses of the mass and quality of the product. The loss of hemp stalk mass in two-stage harvesting (Option А: harvesting of the seedy part of the yield by means of grain harvesting combines and subsequent gathering of the stalks in spring) constitutes approximately 50–80%. The basic possible solution for reducing these losses is raising the cutting height of the stalks when the seedy part of the yield is harvested. With spring harvesting, Option B, the mass of the stalks is preserved, while the seedy part of the yield is completely lost. A rational solution for spring harvesting can be established by calculations, considering the crop volume and the prices of the seeds and stalks sold, as well as the value of technological losses. In the tests conducted during a subsequent harvest in spring the tensile strength of the fibres of the uncut hemp stalks was 25–52% lower than the strength of the fibres harvested in autumn.

Key words:

, ,