Tag Archives: malting barley

517-529 T. Łoboda and E. Wołejko
Effect of pH and Al3+ concentration on growth of spring brewer’s barley
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Effect of pH and Al3+ concentration on growth of spring brewer’s barley

T. Łoboda¹ and E. Wołejko²

¹ Sanitary Biology and Biotechnology Department, Bialystok Technical University, Wiejska45E, 15-351, Bialystok, Poland; e-mail: lobodat@vp.pl
² Institute of Agriculture, Suwalki Higher Vocational School, Noniewicza 10, 16-400 Suwalki,Poland; e-mail: elzbietawolejko@wp.pl

Abstract:

The aim of the study was to check reaction of spring brewer’s barley seedlings to the pH and aluminium concentration of the growing medium. Seedlings of four cultivars of barley (Madonna, Orthega, Philadelphia and Rasbet) were grown at 4 levels of pH (3, 4, 5 and 6) and under 3 doses of Al3+ (0, 150 and 300 µmol dm-3). Significant differences in dry matter of roots and shoots were found for the studied cultivars and plants grown at different pH and concentrations of Al3+. Cv. Madonna had the highest tolerance to aluminium ions at low pH (3 and 4) of the medium and also the highest chlorophyll content in the leaves among those studied. With an increase of aluminium concentration, phosphorus content in dry matter of the leaves decreased from 0.66% in control plants to 0.52% under 300 μmol Al3+ dm-3 and the magnesium content decreased from 0.16% in control to 0.12% under 150 μmol Al3+ dm-3 and 0.10% under 300 μmol Al3+ dm-3.

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99–103 Ü. Tamm
The variation of agronomic characteristics of European malting barley varieties
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The variation of agronomic characteristics of European malting barley varieties

Ü. Tamm

Jõgeva Plant Breeding Institute, 48309 Jõgeva, Estonia; e-mail: Ylle.Tamm@jpbi.ee

Abstract:

The field experiments were carried out in 1999_2002 at the Jõgeva Plant Breeding Institute (PBI) in Estonia to investigate the genetic and environmental variation of agronomic characteristics of malting barley. 57 malting barley varieties were included in the trials. Grain yield, number of tillers per 1m², plant height, lodging resistance and growing time were measured in the trial with malting barley.
 Despite very different weather conditions, the grain yield stability of malting barley varieties was very high. Tillering  showed somewhat lower genetic variability compared to the variation of grain yield. The plant height indicates moderate genetic variability. Lodging resistance and growing time showed  low genetic variability.

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