Tag Archives: meat quality

1306–1314 I. Jansons, V. Strazdina, R. Anenkova, D. Pule, I. Skadule and L. Melece
Development of new pig carcasses classification formulas and changes in the lean meat content in Latvian pig population
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Development of new pig carcasses classification formulas and changes in the lean meat content in Latvian pig population

I. Jansons¹*, V. Strazdina¹, R. Anenkova¹, D. Pule¹, I. Skadule² and L. Melece³

¹Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment ‘BIOR’, St: Lejupes 3, Riga LV-1076, Latvia
²Food and Veterinary Service, St. Peldu 30, LV-1050 Riga, Latvia
³Institute of Agricultural Resources and Economics, St. Struktoru 14, Riga, LV-1039, Latvia
*Correspondence: imantsjansons@inbox.lv

Abstract:

 Pig classification is based on objective estimation of the lean meat content of the carcasses. The European Union established a common framework for the classification of pig carcasses. Carcass classification serves as a quality development tool to encourage the breeding of animals, from which it is possible to get high quality carcasses for processors and consumers. It is a common practice to recalculate pig carcasses classification formulas and update existing classification methods (or develop new methods) after every five years.
The representative samples of 145 pig carcasses from all regions of Latvia were used for the dissection trial. The precisely dissected carcasses with the warm carcass weight 60–110 kg were selected according to fat thickness and gender of pigs (the sex ratio were 50% females and 50% castrated males). From the experimental data were developed new formulas for the four methods Intrascope (Optical Probe); Manual method (ZP); Pork Grader (PG200); Optigrade MCP. During sampling the average warm carcass weight was 89.31 kg. New coefficient was detected and formula was developed for calculation of carcass standard presentation in all cases if some of the carcass parts are missing; for the missing head 8.345, for the missing tail 0.072, for the missing forefeet 0.764, for the missing hind feet 1.558. The comparison between the currently used and new experimentally obtained formulas showed difference up to 1.86% in lean meat content. The results suggest high accuracy of new regression formulas, which fully meets requirements of EU legislation.

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900-906 C.M.A. Barone,, R. Di Matteo, L. Rillo, C.E. Rossetti, F. Pagano andD. Matassino
Pork quality of autochthonous genotype Casertana, crossbred Casertana x Duroc and hybrid Pen ar Lan in relation to farming systems
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Pork quality of autochthonous genotype Casertana, crossbred Casertana x Duroc and hybrid Pen ar Lan in relation to farming systems

C.M.A. Barone¹,*, R. Di Matteo¹, L. Rillo², C.E. Rossetti², F. Pagano¹ andD. Matassino²

¹University of Naples Federico II. Department of Agriculture, Via Università100, 80055 Portici (NA), Italy. 2ConSDABI. National focal point-FAO. Piano Cappelle, 82100 Benevento, Italy. *Correspondence: carmela.barone@unina.it

Abstract:

In the last decades, the development of livestock has coincided with improvements of the animals performance. The swine has been strongly selected for several traits that determined a significant spread of some genetic types, more productive than the old autochthonous genetic types (AGT). Therefore, the AGT suffered a growing demographic contraction. The AGT are able to reduce the loss of genetic variability, potentially useful for the new generation and they play an important economic role for their productive capacity in harsh environments; furthermore, they can be used to obtain natural and ‘traditional’ products. In the current research the black AGT Casertana (CT) was compared with the crossbreed CT×Duroc in relation to gender (castrated males and entire females) and farming systems: Open Air and Outdoor (plus access to the bush) for some qualitative properties of meat. In addition ‘Fiocco’ ham, a traditional product, from CT, CT×DU and Pen ar Lan pigs was analyzed. The results showed that the CT pigs had a significantly higher percentage of fat, a thicker adipose tissue, and their meat had lower values of hardness, chewiness, shear force, and appeared significantly redder than other genotypes meat. The farming systems and gender did not affect the carcass composition and physical traits of meat.

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1131-1142 A. Tänavots, A. Põldvere, J. Torp, R. Soidla, T. Mahla, H. Andreson andL. Lepasalu
Effect of age on composition and quality of Longissimus thoracis muscle of the moose (Alces alces L.) harvested in Estonia
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Effect of age on composition and quality of Longissimus thoracis muscle of the moose (Alces alces L.) harvested in Estonia

A. Tänavots¹*, A. Põldvere²⋅³, J. Torp², R. Soidla², T. Mahla², H. Andreson² andL. Lepasalu²

¹Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Kreutzwaldi 62, 51014, Tartu, Estonia; *Correspondence: alo.tanavots@emu.ee 2Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kreutzwaldi 56/5, 51014, Tartu, Estonia 3Estonian Pig Breeding Association, Aretuse 2, 61411 Märja, Tartumaa, Estonia

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the biochemical composition and technological parameters of muscle (Longissimus thoracis) from adult and calf moose (Alces alces L.) hunter-harvested in the forest of southern Estonia. The experiment was based on 13 hunted moose, of which seven were adults (two males and five females) and six calves (two males and four females). The highest intramuscular fat (IMF) level was found in adult female moose muscles (1.50%), and the lowest in adult male moose muscle (0.46%). Adult moose muscles had higher IMF level (1.14%) than calves (0.98%) (P = 0.451). The protein content found in the muscle samples of adult moose was 0.64% higher than that in calves (21.80%) (P = 0.045). The moisture content of muscle from adult moose was lower (75.30%) and varied more than that of calves (76.07%) (P = 0.051). The initial (5.00–5.59) and ultimate (5.40–5.64) pH in muscle samples were within the normal range, both in adults and calves, except in one of the hunted female calf that had high pH values (pH45min = 6.60 and pH72hr = 6.90), obviously because of stress. The WHC of moose muscles was considerably high (60.50–75.20%), and cooking loss for thermally processed moose muscle ranged between 19.10% and 33.39%. Muscle sample from adult moose had the highest cooking loss (29.69%) while that from the calves was the lowest (26.42%) (P = 0.191). More force (32.54 N) was needed to share muscle samples from adult moose compared to cutting the samples from calves (23.92 N) (P = 0.374). Based on the results of the experiments it can be concluded that the meat from younger moose had better technological quality and tenderness.

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389-394 I. Jansons, A. Jemeljanovs, I. H. Konosonoka, V. Sterna, B. Lujane
The Influence of Organic Acid Additive, Phytoadditive and Complex of Organic Acid Additive Phytoadditive on Pig Productivity, Meat Quality
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The Influence of Organic Acid Additive, Phytoadditive and Complex of Organic Acid Additive Phytoadditive on Pig Productivity, Meat Quality

I. Jansons, A. Jemeljanovs, I. H. Konosonoka, V. Sterna, B. Lujane

Research Institute of Biotechnology and Veterinary Medicine “Sigra” of Latvia University of Agriculture, Instituta 1, Sigulda, Latvia, LV-2150; e-mail: sigra@lis.lv

Abstract:

A study was conducted to determine the efficiency of organic acids, phytoadditives and an organic acids and phytoadditive complex on pigs' growth processes and meat quality. Control group pigs (group 1) were fed with a complete ration (basic feed); the trial group pigs additionally received an organic acid additive (group 2), a phytoadditive (group 3), an organic acids and phytoadditive complex (group 4). The highest impact of 12% on the live weight gain of pigs was exercised by inclusion of the newly developed phytoadditive in the feed ration compared with the control group. The feed conversion ratio for pigs having received organic acid additives was by 4.2% higher, for animals having received the phytoadditive – by 8.1% and for animals having received a complex of both – by 7.45% higher than for the control group pigs where feed consumption was 3.09. The phytoadditive and the organic acids and phytoadditive complex as a pig feed supplement ensures a higher protein quality in muscle tissue, i.e., a higher nutritive value. The highest impact on the cholesterol level reduction in muscle tissue was exercised by the phytoadditive by 51.1 mg kg−1 in comparison with the control group.

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