Tag Archives: mechanical harvesting

xxx B. Bernardi, J. Tous, S. Benalia, L.M. Abenavoli, G. Zimbalatti, T. Stillitano and A.I. De Luca
The assessment of hazelnut mechanical harvesting productivity
Abstract |
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The assessment of hazelnut mechanical harvesting productivity

B. Bernardi¹, J. Tous², S. Benalia¹*, L.M. Abenavoli¹, G. Zimbalatti¹, T. Stillitano¹ and A.I. De Luca¹

¹University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Department of Agraria, Feo di Vito IT89122 Reggio Calabria, Italy
²EMP Agrícola. Sant Antoni 26, ES43480 Vila-seca Tarragona, Spain
*Correspondence: soraya.benalia@unirc.it

Abstract:

Hazelnut cultivation represents a new opportunity for Calabrian mountainous and sloping areas (Southern Italy), where no alternative fruit crops, except forestry, could be settled. In this Region, hazelnut production doubled during the last fifty years, inciting the farmers to introduce mechanization in cropping practices such as harvesting in order to increase productivity and decrease production costs. Indeed, harvesting is currently one of the most expensive processes of the productive cycle, moreover to be time consuming if carried out manually. Mechanization degree depends significantly on the terrain topography: in sloping areas, rakes are often associated to aspirating machines to harvest the fallen fruit, while the employment of harvesting machines from the ground prevails in flat areas. In this context, the present paper aims to assess technical and economic aspects of harvesting operation, using a harvester from the ground model ‘Jolly 2800’ (GF s.r.l., Italy). Particularly, for technical purposes data about operational working time as well as working productivity were collected according to CIOSTA requirements, in two harvesting sites, whereas, for mechanical harvesting economic evaluation, an estimation model was applied to calculate machinery cost per hour. Moreover, the cost per kg of hazelnut in shell and the average cost per hectare were estimated also. The obtained results show a working productivity of 0.065 ha h-1 op-1 in the first harvesting site, while it was equal to 0.022 ha h-1 op-1 in the second one. Concerning the average cost per hectare, the second harvesting site showed the worst economic performances, with 550.76 € ha-1 against 182.54 € ha-1 obtained in the first one.

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7-16 L.M. Abenavoli and A.R. Proto
Effects of the divers olive harvesting systems on oil quality
Abstract |

Effects of the divers olive harvesting systems on oil quality

L.M. Abenavoli* and A.R. Proto

Department of AGRARIA, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria, Italy; *Correspondence: laben@unirc.it

Abstract:

Three olives harvesting systems from the tree have been compared (manual, facilitated and mechanical) through experimental trials carried out respectively in three plots of a Calabrian olive orchard in the Province of Crotone. The grove is traditional and monovarietal, composed of Carolea cultivar with a planting density of about 150 plants ha-1. In this study, work productivity in three divers sites where harvesting was achieved according to different systems has been examined, as well as their effects on produced oil quality. Olives have been harvested by mean of sticks and nets in the manual harvesting (system I), by mechanical aids and nets in the facilitated harvesting (system II), and finally, by mean of trunk shaker and nets in mechanical harvesting (system III).The different work sites have been examined in terms of work productivity, as well as in terms of impact on final product quality, through the withdrawal of a series of oil samples extracted separately and analyzed in laboratory. From the effectuated trials, it has emerged that the site operating with mechanical harvesting has achieved the best results, both from quantitative and qualitative points of view. Indeed, olives harvested mechanically, certainly more intact than those harvested with other systems, produced oil with the best organoleptic parameters.

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