Tag Archives: milk quality

xxx B. Osmane, I.H. Konosonoka, A. Trupa and L. Proskina
Peas and beans as a protein feed for dairy cows
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Peas and beans as a protein feed for dairy cows

B. Osmane*, I.H. Konosonoka, A. Trupa and L. Proskina

Latvia University of Agriculture, Svetes street 18, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: baiba.osmane@arei.lv

Abstract:

The need for alternative protein sources to soybean meal, partially or fully substituted in the diets of dairy cows, is an urgent problem in farming nowadays. Soybean meal is the most common protein source included in feed concentrate for dairy cows in Latvia and in other European countries as well. Among possible alternatives, grain legumes seem interesting for dairy cow diets because of their rapid degradation in the rumen and readily available energy. Peas and beans will be an important source of proteins in feed. Biochemical tests were done on eight samples of domestically grown dried peas of average size, 11 samples of dried beans of average size and some samples of soybean meal to examine the chemical composition of the peas and beans. Peas and beans were included in the feed ration during a feeding trial on dairy cows. Milk yields and milk quality parameters were examined in the trial. The digestibility of peas of most varieties and breeding lines examined was considerably higher than that of soybean meal, while the digestibility of beans of all the varieties and breeding lines examined and of soybean meal was the same. The peas contained more reducing sugars, starches and had a higher value of NEL than the tested beans, which meant the peas had a higher nutritional value. The diets comprising beans and peas fed to the dairy cows increased the fat and protein contents of milk, compared with the control group and the beginning of the trial. The total amount of amino acids increased in the bulk milk samples of all the trial groups during the feeding trial.

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369–375 L. Cielava,, D. Jonkus and L. Paura
Lifetime milk productivity and quality in farms with different housing and feeding systems
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Lifetime milk productivity and quality in farms with different housing and feeding systems

L. Cielava¹,*, D. Jonkus¹ and L. Paura²

¹ Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Agrobiotechnologies, Lielā 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
² Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Information Technologies, Department of Control systems, Lielā 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: lasma.cielava@llu.lv

Abstract:

Housing and feeding systems in farms are main factors that affects cow milk productivity and its quality. The largest proportion of Latvian farms are small farms with tie stall housing system and grazing in summer. The aim of our study was to determine to what extent different housing and feeding systems affect the milk productivity, quality and cow longevity characterizing traits of Latvian dairy cows. In study we analysed 3,179 Holstein Black and White (HBW) and Latvian Brown (LB) breed cows from which 2,383 were located in 2 farms with loose housing system and TMR feeding and 796 cows were located in 8 small farms with tie stall housing system and different feed in summer and winter periods. The average daily milk yield significantly higher (p < 0.05) were in farms with loose housing system – 23.53 kg ECM, but in farms with Tie stall housing system was obtained 18.46 kg ECM per day. HBW breed cows characterized with lower somatic cell count in milk than Latvian brown in both housing systems. The highest somatic cell count in milk was obtained from third lactation LB breed cows in Tie stall housing system (249.11 thous. in 1mL-1 milk) and the lowest from HBW cows in loose housing system (127.57 thous. in 1mL-1 milk). Cows in smaller farms characterized with longer lifespan – 2,098.7 and 1,890 days for large farms, but lifetime milk productivity was significantly higher in farms with loose housing system where was obtained 21,315.9 kg ECM whereas in Tie stall system farms average life productivity was 19,740.2 kg ECM.

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241-247 A. Laurs and J. Priekulis
Robotic milking of dairy cows
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Robotic milking of dairy cows

A. Laurs and J. Priekulis

Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Latvia University of Agriculture,J. Čakstes bulv.5, LV3001, Jelgava, Latvia; e-mail: armins.laurs@promedia.lv

Abstract:

In countries with developed dairy farming milking robots are gaining wide popularity. The first milking equipment of this kind was installed in Latvia in 2007 and found interest among partitioning animal breeders and among scientists. The main feature of the milking robots is that cows can be milked independently, without human assistance and “on demand”. The aim of our research was to state how often the cows visited the robots, and to compare the load (capacity) and quality of the obtained milk to traditional milking equipment. In our experiments, the cows visited the robots 2.9 times a day, on average. Two robots that served a group of 73 cows were loaded to 65%. Therefore, the capacity can be enlarged to 110 cows. With the use of robots, milk quality indices were higher than milking with stall-type equipment with parallel location of animals.

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