Tag Archives: monitoring

367–371 J. Hart and V. Hartová
Development of a system for locating of persons by triangulation
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Development of a system for locating of persons by triangulation

J. Hart¹* and V. Hartová²

¹Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS), Faculty of Engineering, Department
of Technological Equipment of Buildings, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 21 Prague,
Czech republic
²Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS), Faculty of Engineering, Department
of Vehicles and Ground Transport, Kamýcká 129, CZ 165 21 Prague, Czech republic
*Correspondence: janhart77@gmail.com

Abstract:

Systems that monitor movement of persons are closely linked to ensuring the security of the entire monitored complex. The security of the buildings is mediated via different types of systems such as I&HAS, CCTV, EFS, and others. These systems are combined with each other in order to achieve more optimal security of the guarded building. Patrol, attendance and other surveillance systems that do not provide the exact location of a person via coordinates are also used to monitor specific groups of people. For this reason, our goal is to design a system that is able to locate the monitored person (employee) in the building with minimal deviation.

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216-225 V. Poikalainen, J. Praks, E. Kokin, A. Aland, I. Veermäe, S. Peets, J. Ahokas, M. Pastell, M. Hautala, D. Berckmans, C. Bahr, and D. Miljkovic
Elaboration of Basic Methods for Automatic Analysis of Cows’ Gait
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Elaboration of Basic Methods for Automatic Analysis of Cows’ Gait

V. Poikalainen¹, J. Praks¹, E. Kokin¹, A. Aland¹, I. Veermäe¹, S. Peets¹, J. Ahokas², M. Pastell², M. Hautala², D. Berckmans³, C. Bahr³, and D. Miljkovic³

1 Estonian University of Life Sciences, 1 Kreutzwaldi Str., EE51014 Tartu, Estonia
e-mail: vaino.poikalainen@emu.ee
² University of Helsinki, Department of Agrotechnology, P.O. Box 28 (Koetilantie 3),
00014 Helsinki, Finland; e-mail: Jukka.ahokas@helsinki.fi
³ Division Measure, Model & Manage Bioresponses (M3-BIORES), Katholike Universiteit
Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
e-mail: Claudia.Bahr@biw.kuleuven.be

Abstract:

Two different methods for automatic registration and analysis were used to produce data for comparison and analysis of lame and healthy animals’ gait in Estonia. A walk over mat with two quazi-piezoelectric sensors was elaborated and tested in co-operation with University of Helsinki. Preliminary analysis indicates that lameness can be seen as asymmetric gait and thus the quazi-piezoelectric walk-over mat is a promising tool for automatic leg problem detection.
A video-system was introduced to record walking pattern of cows in co-operation with Catholic University of Leuven. For video recordings three cameras were used to obtain top, side and leg views with StreamPix software video-signal capture. Possibilities of image based separation of dairy cows with real time vision system and preliminary settlement of this was developed. A model-based motion scoring system is proposed for derivation of image parameters needed for lameness detection.
About 600 cows once a week were investigated in a large dairy farm during four months’ period.
Dairy cows’ gait pattern was recorded with the aid of quazi-piezoelectric walk-over mat and video-system. Preliminary lameness scoring was performed in the cowshed visually by two experts. These scoring results were later specified by expert commission on the basis of video-recordings. Lameness scores (according to Sprecher et al) were assigned as follows: 1–6,012 cases, 2–1,181 cases, 3–522 cases, 4–105 cases and 5–37 cases from total 10,653 cases. The database of cows’ identification numbers, lameness scores and disordered legs description was created, that allows synchronization of walk-over mat signals data and video files.

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749-754 I. Turka
Monitoring and inspection problems of GM crops situated potentially close to organic and beekeeping farms
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Monitoring and inspection problems of GM crops situated potentially close to organic and beekeeping farms

I. Turka

Latvia University of Agriculture, 2 Liela, Jelgava, LV 3001,phone: +3713021998, e-mail: Inara.Turka@llu.lv

Abstract:

Precise information is essential to carry out qualitative inspections and monitoring that would help prevent the presence of the undesirable admixture of a GMO in organic and apicultural products. In order to be sure that coexistence is possible, theoretical investigation has been carried out on the basis of field blocks of institutions, on the basis of EU support. One of the most important coexistence requirements is a separation distance of 4000 m for fully fertile GM rapeseed from its organic congeners. The distance of 4000 m was scientifically defined taking into consideration the rather fragmented manner of crop production in Latvia. Regulations for restricted areas around the field blocks were determined in Latvia.

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105–111 Alma Valskytė, Kęstutis Tamošiūnas, Janina Gošovskienė and Gintautas Cesevičius
Monitoring of early attacks of late blight in Lithuania
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Monitoring of early attacks of late blight in Lithuania

Alma Valskytė¹, Kęstutis Tamošiūnas², Janina Gošovskienė³ and Gintautas Cesevičius⁴

¹Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture Voke branch, Žalioji a.2, 4002 Vilnius, Lithuania; e-mail: alma.valskyte@voke.lzi.lt
²Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture, Instituto al. 1, Akademija, Kėdainių r., l, Lithuania; e-mail: lziaa@lzi.lt
³State Plant Protection Service, Pelesos 85, Vilnius, Lithuania; e-mail: vaatgo@vaat.lt
⁴Lithuanian Agricultural Advisory Service, Stoties 5, Akademija, 5051 Kėdainių r., Lithuania; e-mail: aug3@lzukt.lt

Abstract:

Late blight monitoring means continual observations of late blight development during potato vegetation period. The aim of potato late blight monitoring is to establish the first appearance of late blight symptoms and to observe the development of potato late blight in different regions of Lithuania.  The Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture (LIA), the Lithuanian Agricultural Advisory Service (LAAS) and the State Plant Protection Service (SPPS) implement monitoring of late blight in Lithuania and have been taking part in the program of late blight monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic countries since 1999 (http://www.web-blight.net).
In 2001 potato late blight monitoring was carried out in 20 districts of Lithuania. Observations were made in 53 fields and 23 potato varieties of different maturity and susceptibility. First symptoms of late blight in Lithuania in 2001 were established on  15 June in Varėna district. During the season, the development of late blight had an epiphytotic character.

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