Tag Archives: Norway Spruce

64-82 G. Cekstere, A. Osvalde, V. Nollendorfs, A. Karlsons, J. Pormale, P. Zalitis, G. Snepsts, S. Minova, L. Jankevica and M. Laivins
Effects of fertilization on Picea abies stands situated on drained peat soils
Abstract |

Effects of fertilization on Picea abies stands situated on drained peat soils

G. Cekstere¹*, A. Osvalde¹, V. Nollendorfs¹, A. Karlsons¹, J. Pormale¹, P. Zalitis², G. Snepsts², S. Minova³, L. Jankevica³ and M. Laivins²

¹University of Latvia, Institute of Biology, Laboratory of Plant Mineral Nutrition, Miera street 3, LV-2169, Salaspils, Latvia
²Latvian State Forest Research Institute ‘Silava’, Riga street 111, LV-2169, Salaspils, Latvia
³University of Latvia, Institute of Biology, Laboratory of Experimental Entomology and Microbiology, Miera street 3, LV-2169, Salaspils, Latvia
*Correspondence: gunta.cekstere@lu.lv

Abstract:

Norway spruce used for afforestation of drained peat soils frequently has low productivity and decay in a long-term, which could be related to soil chemical composition and nutrient status. The research aim was to elucidate the effect of PSM on new Norway spruce plantings (1st experiment) and 20-year-old spruce stands (2nd experiment) on drained peat soils by evaluating: (1) nutrient accumulation in soil-plant system, (2) soil microbiological activity, (3) health status of spruce individuals, (4) growth intensity and productivity of spruce, (5) changes in composition of vascular plant and moss species. The study was conducted at two forest (Myrtillosa turf.mel.) sites in Latvia, each consisting of two plots: control and treated with PMS (100 g m-2 in September 2007, 50 g m-2 in April 2008). During 2008–2016, regular analysis of soil, spruce needles, soil microbiology, assessment of tree crown vitality, stand productivity, inventory of vascular plant and moss species were done. The results showed that the fertilization with PMS resulted in a significantly improved K, Ca, Zn, and N status of trees, crown vitality and up to three times increased tree growth parameters at both experiments during the study period. The average count of bacteria and fungi in soil of fertilized plots, accompanied by a remarkable variability in the study years, was significantly higher only for the 1st experiment. Fungi: bacteria ratio for the fertilized and control plots differed significantly only for the 1st experiment. Significant increase of cover with nitrophilic plant (Urtica dioica, Antriscus sylvestris, Rubus idaeus) and moss (Plagiomnium cuspidatum, P. ellipticum) species at both fertilized sites were stated.

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468–477 D. Lazdiņa, I. Bebre, K. Dūmiņš, I. Skranda, A. Lazdins, J. Jansons and S. Celma
Wood ash – green energy production side product as fertilizer for vigorous forest plantations
Abstract |
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Wood ash – green energy production side product as fertilizer for vigorous forest plantations

D. Lazdiņa*, I. Bebre, K. Dūmiņš, I. Skranda, A. Lazdins, J. Jansons and S. Celma

Latvian State Forest Research Institute ‘Silava’, Riga str. 111, LV-2169 Salaspils, Latvia
*Correspondence: dagnija.lazdina@silava.lv

Abstract:

Notable amounts of wood ash containing plant macro and micronutrient elements in balanced proportions are produced in Latvia. If bioenergy production source product is plant material, and facilities are operating well, then ‘side product’ fermentation residues or wood ashes should not contain elements in toxic concentrations. Wood ash contains P and K which are lacking in acidic organic soils and could work as fertiliser as well as a long term liming agent, besides that, all micronutrient elements necessary for physiological processes are present in wood ash. Wood ash could also be used as ‘revitalization agents’ – fertilisers to improve the growth of plantation forests. The aim of this research is to find and describe the positive effect of wood ash fertilisers on Norway spruce (Picea abies) and other economically valuable tree species. Research results show positive wood ash application effect on tree growth and vitality within the first 4 years when used for recultivation and revitalization purposes. Recycling of wood ash (0.5–3 t ha- 1 before planting) for fertilisation of and Picea abies forest plantations are a sustainable and effective solution for the improvement of tree growth as well as an environmentally safe method of utilization of bioenergy production residues.

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495–512 Z. Libiete, A. Bardule and A. Lupikis
Long-term effect of spruce bark ash fertilization on soil properties and tree biomass increment in a mixed scots pine-Norway spruce stand on drained organic soil
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Long-term effect of spruce bark ash fertilization on soil properties and tree biomass increment in a mixed scots pine-Norway spruce stand on drained organic soil

Z. Libiete, A. Bardule and A. Lupikis*

Latvian State Forest Research Institute Silava, Rigas Str. 111, LV-2169 Salaspils, Latvia
*Correspondence: ainars.lupikis@silava.lv

Abstract:

Ash contains all plant nutrients, except N, and is often used to facilitate forest growth and to prevent nutrient depletion potentially caused by harvesting. In this paper, we report effects of a large dose of spruce bark ash on soil properties and tree biomass increment in a mixed Scots pine-Norway spruce stand on drained organic soil in central Latvia, 12 years after ash application. Significant positive growth response after wood ash fertilization was recorded only for overstorey spruce. During the 12 years after fertilization the additional volume increment was 8.3 m3 ha-1 or 0.7 m3 ha-1 annually. The effect of wood ash application is long-term. Also 12 years after treatment fertilized overstorey spruces demonstrated 0.6 m3 ha-1 additional annual volume increment compared to the controls. Additional diameter increment increased during the first 10 years after treatment but started to decrease in 2012. Results demonstrate that ash fertilization did not change N availability in the soil, and additional growth can be explained with improved supply of P, Ca, Mg and other nutrients. Ash application did not significantly influence the chemical composition of the O layer.

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