Tag Archives: organic food

67–74 N. Kamińska, M. Gaworski, P. Kaźmierska and A.M. Klepacka
Pilot study of variability on demand and knowledge concerning organic food on an example of two Polish regions
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Pilot study of variability on demand and knowledge concerning organic food on an example of two Polish regions

N. Kamińska*, M. Gaworski, P. Kaźmierska and A.M. Klepacka

Department of Production Management and Engineering, Warsaw University of Life
Sciences, Nowoursynowska str. 164, PL 02-878 Warsaw, Poland
*Correspondence: natalia.kaminska@poczta.onet.pl

Abstract:

The paper focuses on showing variability of knowledge and demand for organic food in two regions of Poland, i.e. Świętokrzyskie and Mazovian provinces. The selected for detailed investigations Polish regions differed in society wealth. Mazovia province with capitol (Warsaw) is reach as opposed to Świętokrzyskie – mountain province with dominance of more difficult conditions for comfort and affluent life. Basing on questionnaire the group of respondents’ attitude towards organic food was recognized and compared. The problems included in the questionnaire there were factors influencing the organic food buying, factors which influence about the resignation of organic food buying, the availability of information about organic food, availability of organic food in selected regions, requirements for organic food, most frequently purchased organic products, place where consumers buy organic food, consumption frequency of organic food, factors influencing the choice of organic food. The comparison of two provinces indicated differences within the meaning of organic food as well as autonomy in consumer behaviour. Polish society is characterized by a growing interest in organic food. The production industrialization and mass food processing causes people to look for some alternatives. Organic farming gives people that chance. In the conclusions, we have formulated a term mean that due to the consumption of organic products – ‘we are what we eat’.

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647-653 A.-K. Løes and B. Nölting
Organic school meal systems – towards a more sustainable nutrition
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Organic school meal systems – towards a more sustainable nutrition

A.-K. Løes¹ and B. Nölting²

¹Bioforsk Organic Food and Farming, Gunnars veg 6, N-6630 Tingvoll, Norway;e-mail: anne-kristin.loes@bioforsk.no, www.ipopy.coreportal.org
²Berlin Institute of Technology, Hardenbergstr. 36A, 10623 Berlin, Germany;e-mail: noelting@ztg.tu-berlin.de

Abstract:

Nutritional and health problems related to life style alarm European governments. The interest in school meals as a lever for change is increasing because young people reside longer in public institutions and their often unsatisfactory eating patterns might be counterbalanced by healthy school food. Organic food contributes to sustainable nutrition, and hence is an interesting starting point for healthier menus and food education. The research project ‘innovative Public Organic food Procurement for Youth’ (iPOPY) studies efficient ways to implement organic food in public serving outlets for young people. The project has four explorative work packages studying policies, supply chains and certification, the young consumers’ perception and learning about sustainability and organic food, and health effects of organic menus in Denmark, Finland, Italy, and Norway. Finland and Italy serve a warm school meal daily for all pupils, whereas Denmark and Norway rely on packed lunch from home. Italy and Denmark have ambitious goals for organic food in schools, whereas Finland and Norway have not (yet). Political decisions are required, but not enough, to ensure well functioning organic school meal systems.

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719-727 E. Rembiałkowska and D. Średnicka
Organic food quality and impact on human health
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Organic food quality and impact on human health

E. Rembiałkowska and D. Średnicka

Chair of Organic Foodstuffs, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Sciences,Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warszawa, Poland, phone: 48 22 5937038, fax: 48 22 5937036;e-mail: ewa_rembialkowska@sggw.pl.

Abstract:

During the last decades consumers‟ trust in food quality and safety has drastically decreased, mainly due to several food scandals and growing ecological awareness. Consumers have started to look for safer foods, produced in environmentally friendly, authentic and local systems. Organically produced foods are believed to satisfy these demands.Organic crops contain less nitrates and pesticide residues, but more dry matter, vitamin C,phenolic compounds, essential amino acids and sugars than conventional ones. Organically produced milk contains usually more dry matter, fat, calcium, selected vitamins and beneficial conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) compared to conventional milk from high input systems. Meat from organically raised cattle, pigs and sheep was found to contain less total fats and saturated fatty acids but higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and better n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio.The health effects of organic vs. conventional foods have been investigated in severalstudies. In vitro analyses indicated better repair of bacterial DNA and decrease of cancer cells proliferation on organic vs. conventional plant materials. Animal studies indicated better fertility indexes and increased immune parameters in organically fed animals. The effects of organic foods on human health are still not well known. However, according to PARSIFAL study children representing antrophosophic lifestyle, including biodynamic and organic food, had less allergies and lower body weight, while KOALA study associated consumption of organic dairy products with lower eczema risk in children.The overall number of studies analyzing the quality and safety of organic foods andinvestigating the health effects of organic food consumption is growing. However, the results are still insufficient to formulate the explicit conclusions.

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768-774 S. Żakowska-Biemans
+Factors underlying consumption of organic food in the opinion of Polish consumers
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+Factors underlying consumption of organic food in the opinion of Polish consumers

S. Żakowska-Biemans

Department of Organization and Economics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and ConsumerSciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, ul. Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warszawa

Abstract:

Organic food market in Poland is still at the early stage of development and there are many barriers to overcome, related to both supply as well as demand for organic produce, in order to develop domestic organic food market. Analyses of own data from 2004, 2005 and 2007 face to face interviews with representative samples of Polish consumers show that the most important factors driving purchases of organic food are health, safety and taste. However, other concerns like animal welfare are also pronounced. Organic food have positive connotations in the opinion of Polish consumers. Besides the positive points of organic food, various negative comments also arose, resulting not so much from the essence of organic food itself, but its availability, information on organic food as well as the feeling it is overpriced.

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