Tag Archives: pea

343-356 J. Pozdíšek, B. Henriksen, A. Ponížil and A.-K. Løes
Utilizing legume-cereal intercropping for increasing self- sufficiency on organic farms in feed for monogastric animals
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Utilizing legume-cereal intercropping for increasing self- sufficiency on organic farms in feed for monogastric animals

J. Pozdíšek¹, B. Henriksen², A. Ponížil³ and A.-K. Løes²

¹Research Institute of Cattle Breeding, Rapotín s.r.o, Výzkumníků 267, 788 13 Vikýřovice, Czech Republic; e-mail:jan.pozdisek@vuchs.cz
²Bioforsk - Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Organic Food and Farming Division, Gunnars veg 6, NO-6630 Tingvoll, Norway; e-mail: britt.henriksen@bioforsk.no and anne-kristin.loes@bioforsk.no
³Agritec, research, breeding and services Ltd., Zemědělská 16, 787 01 Šumperk, Czech Republic; e-mail: ponizil@agritec.cz

Abstract:

In 2009, controlled field trials were conducted on three certified organic farms with field pea (leaf type), spring barley and spring wheat in monocultures and mixtures (pea:cereal ratio 60:40) to study the possibility of producing fodder for monogastric animals under Czech conditions. By grain harvest time, seed samples were collected and analysed for dry matter, ash, crude protein, fat and crude fiber, and content of organic matter and nitrogen-free extracts (NFE) were determined. Weed harrowing at various pea heights were included at one farm. Samples for analysis of tannins and trypsin-inhibitor activity (TIA) were taken from treatments with no weed harrowing (H0) and harrowings at 5 and 10 cm pea height (H2). Analyses of amino acids were conducted from H0-samples. To complement the data from the farm trials, samples of grains from treatments with the same pea and cereal varieties in plot trials conducted in 2008 and 2009 studying the effect of pea:cereal seed ratio and weed harrowing at various pea heights, were analysed. In cereals, the crude protein content increased by intercropping with pea. This increase was compensated for by a decrease in NFE. Wheat and barley grown in mixtures with peas seemed to contain more methionine than cereals in monoculture, and there tends to be higher threonine content in intercropped barley compared with barley monoculture. This is positive for the nutrition of monogastric animals.  There were no pronounced effects of intercropping on tannins or TIA or on the content of other analysed nutrients in the cereals. The chemical composition of peas was not significantly impacted by intercropping.

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339-344 J. Rysová, J. Ouhrabková, D. Gabrovská, I. Paulíčková, R. Winterová, T. Vymyslický, J. Prokeš and M. Hutař4
Food with addition of little-known legume varieties
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Food with addition of little-known legume varieties

J. Rysová¹, J. Ouhrabková¹, D. Gabrovská¹, I. Paulíčková¹, R. Winterová¹, T. Vymyslický², J. Prokeš³ and M. Hutař4

¹Food Research Institute Prague, Radiová ⁷, ¹0² ³¹ Praha¹0, Czech Republic; e-mail:jana.rysova@vupp.cz
²Agricultural Research, Ltd., Zahradní 1, 664 41 Troubsko, Czech Republic
³PRO-BIO, Trading Company Ltd., Lipová 40, 788 32 Staré Město, Czech Republic
⁴Research Institute of Brewing and Malting, Lipová 15, 120 44 Praha 2, Czech Republic

Abstract:

The nutritional value of little known legumes was studied. Grass pea, old variety of pea,  dark  varieties  of  beans  and  chickpea  were  processed  into  flour,  farina,  flakes  and  malt. These  raw  materials  were  added  into  bread,  bakery  products,  pastas,  spreads  and  desserts; tempeh  was  prepared  by  fermentation  with  Rhizopus  mould.  Foods  with  legumes  were submitted  to  nutritional  evaluation  and  sensory  analysis.  The  addition  of  legumes  to  bakery goods increased proteins and fibre content and decreased the energy value. The level of ODAP and α- galactosides decreased significantly during tempeh preparation.

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592-598 Henriksen, B.I.F., A.R. Lundon, E. Prestløkken,U. Abrahamsen and R. Eltun
Nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops, and quality of potential organic protein feed for ruminants and poultry
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Nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops, and quality of potential organic protein feed for ruminants and poultry

Henriksen, B.I.F.¹, A.R. Lundon², E. Prestløkken³,U. Abrahamsen² and R. Eltun²

¹Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Organic Food and FarmingDivision, Gunnars vei 6, N–6630 Tingvoll, Norway; britt.henriksen@bioforsk.no
²Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Arable Crops Division,Rute 509, N–2849 Kapp, Norway
³Felleskjøpet Fôrutvikling, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway

Abstract:

The aim of organic farming husbandry is to be entirely based on an organically produced diet. Pea is the most commonly cultivated protein rich crop in organic agriculture in Norway. However other high protein crops with complementary properties are needed to meet the nutritional demands in feeds for ruminants, pigs and poultry. An ongoing study in Bioforsk aims to develop cultivation practices on nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops and to establish knowledge on the feed quality of organically grown oilseed crops used as protein feed. It appears that spring turnip rape (Brassica rapa L. var. oleifera) and Camelina (Camelina sativa L.) can both be successfully cultivated with different levels of supplied nitrogen and sulphur. The nutrient value of organic spring turnip rape seems to be equivalent to conventional protein crops. Camelina can be an alternative in organic production, due to fewer problems with harmful pests compared with the traditional oilseed crops rape and turnip rape. Oilseed cake of turnip rape has higher protein and mineral content than the seed, and can be an interesting addition in feed ration for both ruminants and poultry, especially in combination with field pea.

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684-690 A. Nykänen, L. Jauhiainen and M. Rinne
Biomass production and feeding value of whole-crop cereal-legume silages
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Biomass production and feeding value of whole-crop cereal-legume silages

A. Nykänen¹, L. Jauhiainen² and M. Rinne³

¹ MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Plant Production Research, Lönnrotinkatu 3, FIN-50100Mikkeli, Finland; e-mail: arja.nykanen@mtt.fi
² MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Method Services, FIN-31600 Jokioinen, Finland
³ MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Animal Production Research, FIN-31600 Jokioinen, Finland

Abstract:

In eastern Finland, 12 mixtures of spring wheat, spring barley, spring oats and/or rye with vetches and/or peas  were evaluated in  field experiments from 2005 to 2007 for their dry matter (DM) production, crude protein (CP) concentration and digestibility using three different harvesting  times.  Spring  wheat-pea  and  spring  wheat-vetch-rye  mixtures  produced  the  highest DM  yields  (5,000–6,000  kg  ha-1)  while  the  lowest  yields  were  found  with  spring  oats-vetch (4,000 kg ha-1 DM). The highest CP concentrations were found in vetches (200 g kg-1 DM) and lowest in  spring cereals (90–120 g kg-1  DM). Organic  matter digestibility  was  highest in peas (700–750  g  kg-1)  and  lowest  in  spring  rye  and  wheat  (550–610  g  kg-1).  It  is  suggested  that decisions concerning when to harvest legume-cereal mixtures for forage could be based on the maturity stage of the cereal, because changes in digestibility and CP concentration are slow in legumes during the potential harvesting period.  Key words: barley, dry matter yield, forage digestibility, oats, pea, rye, vetch, wheatINTRODUCTION

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