Tag Archives: plum

603-614 K. Kask, H. Jänes, A. Libek, L. Arus, A. Kikas, H. Kaldmäe, N. Univer andT. Univer
New cultivars and future perspectives in professional fruit breeding in Estonia
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New cultivars and future perspectives in professional fruit breeding in Estonia

K. Kask, H. Jänes, A. Libek, L. Arus, A. Kikas, H. Kaldmäe, N. Univer andT. Univer

Polli Horticultural Research Centre, Institute of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Karksi-Nuia 69108, Estonia;e-mail: polli@emu.ee

Abstract:

During 2001–2010, the following cultivars from the breeding programme of the Polli Horticultural Research Centre of the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences were registered: the apples ‘Kaari’, ‘Kaimo’, ‘Karamba’, ‘Katre’, ‘Kikitriinu’, ‘Krista’, and ‘Liivika’, the crab apples ‘Kuku’, ‘Ritika’, and ‘Ruti’, the sweet cherries ‘Elle’, ‘Karmel’, ‘Piret’ and ‘Tontu’, the raspberries ‘Aita’ and ‘Alvi’, and the black currants ‘Almo’, ‘Ats’, ‘Elo’ and ‘Karri’. Since 2004, applications for registration and DUS testing have been submitted for the new apple cultivar ‘Els’, pear cultivars ‘Kadi’ and ‘Polli Punane’, sweet cherry cultivars ‘Anu’, ‘Ene’, ‘Irma’, ‘Kaspar’, ‘Mupi’, ‘Polli Murel’ and ‘Tõmmu’. Apple, plum, sweet cherry, black currant and raspberry breeding programmes are going on as part of the public breeding program. Winter hardiness is the first-rate goal in all crops. In apple, breeding for scab resistance is now the main task. In the nearest future, some new plum, apple and black currant cultivars will supplement the breeding results of the institution at Polli.

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37–44 H. Jänes and A. Pae
First results of a dwarfing plum rootstocks trial
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First results of a dwarfing plum rootstocks trial

H. Jänes¹ and A. Pae²

¹Polli Horticultural Institute of the Estonian Agricultural University, 69104 Karksi-Nuia, Viljandimaa, Estonia; e-mail: heljo11@hot.ee
²Department of Horticulture of the Estonian Agricultural University, Kreutzwaldi 64, 51014 Tartu, Estonia

Abstract:

For many years, Prunus cerasifera Ehrh. seedlings of high vigour have been the most widespread seedling rootstock in Estonia. Plum growers are interested in less vigorous plum rootstocks which are productive with good fruit quality, easily harvested, early fruiting and less expensive to manage. In a new experiment (a collaborative project together with Latvian, Lithuanian and Byelorussian scientists), two plum cultivars, Queen Victoria and Kubanskaya Kometa, grafted onto 16 different rootstocks:Prunus Ackermann, Prunus Brompton, Prunus Brompton S, Prunus G 5–22, Prunus marianna GF 8–1, Prunus St. Julien A, Prunus St. Julien GF 655/2, Prunus St. Julien INRA 2, Prunus St. Julien Noir, Prunus St. Julien d’Orleans, Prunus St. Julien Wädenswill, Prunus Pixy, Prunus domestica Wangenheims, Prunus cerasifera ‘Hamyra’, P. cerasifera (local) and P. cerasifera myrobalana, were planted in an orchard in spring 2001. The objectives of these trials were to give an assessment of newly introduced plum rootstocks and to find out their compatibility with the studied plum cultivars. According to the results obtained in the first growing season, 45 (11.7%) of the 384 trees planted in 2001 died. The lowest tree dimensions both of ‘Queen Victoria’ and ‘Kubanskaya Kometa’ were noted on Prunus St. Julien Wädenswill. Trees of ‘Kubanskaya Kometa’ on different rootstocks started to bear fruit in the 2nd year after planting (except P. cerasifera Hamyra). ‘Kubanskaya Kometa’ trees grown on Prunus St. Julien INRA 2 and Prunus St. Julien Noir produced significantly better first yield than on control rootstocks. ‘Kubanskaya Kometa’ on Prunus St. Julien A and Prunus Pixy gave the largest fruits (41 g and 40.5 g, respectively).

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