Tag Archives: precision farming

xxx I. Szabó, M. Hushki, Z. Bártfai A. Lágymányosi and L. Kátai
Modelling of operator’s focusing scheme along working hours: Windrowing and cultivating operations
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Modelling of operator’s focusing scheme along working hours: Windrowing and cultivating operations

I. Szabó, M. Hushki, Z. Bártfai A. Lágymányosi and L. Kátai*

Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Mechanics and Machinery, Páter K. street 1, HU2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
*Correspondence: katai.laszlo@gek.szie.hu

Abstract:

Enhancing productivity and cost reduction are two main targets for any production operation. In the agricultural field; It is the role of researchers to come out with reliable models and make it available to be used in modern farming management organizations as well as to the rural farmers. When it comes to the Human Machine Interface it is essential to assess the system in term of the Human Cantered Design aspects. This research is focusing on the developing simple models for the operator’s focusing scheme as a human behaviour inside an off-road vehicle cabin based on the operator’s focusing scheme measuring along working hours using proven and up to date technologies. The results of this research provide the decision makers with reliable inputs using proven methodology regarding the change of operator’s focusing scheme along working hours in two agricultural operations ‘windrowing and cultivating’. Both operations are requiring continuous physical involvement of the operator for checking the attached tool and steering of the vehicle in the planned track, which is directly related to the accumulated passive fatigue as a main contributor of resulted data.

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94-102 M.H. Jørgensen
Agricultural field production in an ‘Industry 4.0’ concept
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Agricultural field production in an ‘Industry 4.0’ concept

M.H. Jørgensen

University of Southern Denmark, Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute, Campusvej 55, DK5230 Odense M, Denmark
*Correspondence: MAHEJ@mmmi.sdu.dk

Abstract:

Precision Agriculture is a well-established concept in agricultural field production. It has developed over the last three decades. As part of this concept, farmers are used to collect and handle data. Farmers are also used to create solutions for field operations based on their knowledge of diversity and local data.
When compared to classic industrial production, agricultural field operations interact with a biologically-active system. From a production management system point of view, industrial production takes place in close, well-defined environments in which performance data can, to a great extent, be measured by deterministic matters: mass (kg), volume/dimensions (m3/m), time (sec), etc.
In agricultural operations such as work involving tillage, seeding, fertilising, and plant care, there are by nature a good many possible adjustments available in order to optimise the operation method, plus intensity and timing. The challenge here is to establish the levels of knowledge that are necessary to support the control of the individual and/or graduated, precision-based operations. Within this context, parameters such as, for example, the workability of the soil cannot be defined in terms of a few deterministic parameters. Neither can the operational impact upon the soil which is made by the tools being used. It is assumed that this challenge is part of the reason why the concept of precision agriculture still contains a great deal of unutilised potential. The hypothesis raised by this article is that analysis should be carried out in regard to whether inspiration for the concept of an ‘Industry 4.0’ can facilitate the establishment of operational solutions in the field of precision farming.

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290–296 J. Tuure, A. Rammo and J. Ahokas
Realtime soil moisture measurement during field work
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Realtime soil moisture measurement during field work

J. Tuure¹, A. Rammo² and J. Ahokas¹*

¹University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences Agrotechnology,
Koetilantie 5, FI 00014 Helsinki, Finland
²University of Mosul, College of Agriculture, Mosul Iraq
*Correspondence: jukka.ahokas@outlook.com

Abstract:

Soil moisture affects grain germination. If the seeds are sown in dry soil the germination is poor and the emergence is uneven. In Finland, the fieldwork during the spring sowing season takes a couple of weeks and during this period the soil is drying or it is wetting if there are rains. If the seeds can be sown to optimal soil moisture content this enhances germination and increases the yield.
Soil moisture content and temperature was measured before spring tillage. By utilizing these results a prototype of soil moisture measurement system was built utilizing commercial NIRtechnology moisture sensor. This system could be used in harrows and drills so that the work is done to proper soil moisture content. The principle functioned reliably when properly calibrated and mounted. The measuring system could be further improved with narrower light beam so that the falling soil aggregates would not have interference to the results. This kind of instrumentation could be used in implements.
Harrowing and sowing season could be prolonged with a small impact on yield if the seeds could be sown to advantageous moisture content. This would be also economical because the work capacity and machine sizes could be reduced. Also risk of soil compaction would be less.

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423-429 R. Zinkevičius
Influence of soil sampling for precision fertilizing
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Influence of soil sampling for precision fertilizing

R. Zinkevičius

Lithuanian University of Agriculture, Studentų g. 15a, Akademija,LT–53362 Kauno raj., e-mail: Remigijus.Zinkevicius@lzuu.lt

Abstract:

The determination of the amount of nutrients in various field locations was investigated using the differential global positioning system (DGPS) and the nutrient mapping (active phosphorus, potassium and acidity) was carried out in order to use precise fertilizer rates for the crops. Two standard methods of taking soil samples are compared: the linear, in which the soil samples are taken from a 1 ha size grid in 50 m length in front of the plot centre with stated DGPS coordinates and 50 m behind the plot centre, and the circular, in which the soil samples are taken at the distance of 10–30 m from the centre point of the plot.The paper analyses the technologies based on precision agricultural methods. The impactof two different soil sampling methods, i.e. the linear and the circular, on the nutrient mapping has been stated. The fertilization plans for the target crop yield are based on the amount of nutrients in different field locations. In precision farming, when different rates of fertilizers are applied in separate plots of the field, circular soil sampling enables saving 31–136 kg ha-1 of active material of phosphorus when linear method of soil sampling is used. Economy of potassium fertilizers in the case of usual farming is less, i.e. 11 kg ha-1 when the linear method of soil sampling is used, and 17 kg ha-1 of active material of potassium when circular method of soil sampling is used.

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