Tag Archives: short rotation forestry

xxx S. Šēnhofa, M. Zeps, L. Ķēniņa, U. Neimane, R. Kāpostiņš, A. Kārkliņa and Ā. Jansons
Intra–annual height growth of hybrid poplars in Latvia. Results from the year of establishment
Abstract |
Full text PDF (545 kB)

Intra–annual height growth of hybrid poplars in Latvia. Results from the year of establishment

S. Šēnhofa, M. Zeps, L. Ķēniņa*, U. Neimane, R. Kāpostiņš, A. Kārkliņa and Ā. Jansons

Latvia State Forest Research Institute Silava, Rigas street 111, LV–2169 Salaspils, Latvia
*Correspondence: laura.kenina@silava.lv

Abstract:

Fast growing hybrid poplars (Populus spp.) could be successfully used for bioenergy as well as wood production. Productivity of clones had been studied in Baltic States recently, however, little is known about the impact of weather conditions on poplar height growth, thus the potential effect of climate change. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the intra–annual height growth of hybrid poplar clones in Latvia. Height increment of 12 hybrid poplar clones was measured on average with an 11–day interval in the first vegetation season in 2016. Annual shoot height was on average 81.0 ± 6.8 cm, significantly (p < 0.001) depending on the poplar clone. Use of long (0.5 m) instead of short (0.3 m) cuttings leaded to larger annual height increment during the year of establishment of the plantation. From June to September the mean growth intensity was 10 to 15 mm day-1. The trend of height growth intensity, described by Gompertz model, indicated that the poplar clones with largest height had relatively fast increase of the growth intensity from June to July. Changes of growth intensity was linked both with the temperature and sum of precipitation. This tendency was not so pronounced for clones with largest height increment, emphasizing the importance of the phenotypic plasticity in selection of clones for plantations.

Key words:

, , ,




1795–1814 M. Welc, A. Lundkvist, N-E. Nordh and T. Verwijst
Weed community trajectories in cereal and willow cultivations after termination of a willow short rotation coppice
Abstract |
Full text PDF (869 kB)

Weed community trajectories in cereal and willow cultivations after termination of a willow short rotation coppice

M. Welc*, A. Lundkvist, N-E. Nordh and T. Verwijst

Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
*Correspondence: Monika.Welc@slu.se

Abstract:

According to guidelines for willow short rotation coppice (SRC), weeding is needed during establishment, while weed populations which develop later under a well-established willow canopy do not require control. However, farmers are concerned that weeds which develop in SRC may result in long-lasting weed infestations in succeeding crops after SRC termination. We assessed the effects of two SRC-termination methods (with shallow and deep soil cultivation) on the development of the weed flora in a cereal system (CS) and in SRC during six seasons. Richness, ground cover, life-cycle strategy and composition of the weed species, and their environmental requirements (inferred from Ellenberg index) were evaluated.
SRC-termination method had no effect on the weed community trajectories in the succeeding SRC and CS. However, cropping system and growing season had significant impacts on species richness, ground cover and composition of the weed flora.
Differences in weed communities over time and between cropping systems were related to the impact of cropping systems on factors such as light, soil moisture, nitrogen level, and soil reaction, as inferred from the Ellenberg index. After termination of the old willow cultivation, the weed flora of the SRC and CS rapidly diverged and approached the weed flora characteristic for old willow stands and non-weeded old cereal plot, respectively. We conclude that willow stands can be converted, regardless of termination method, either into willow or cereal cultivations without additional risk of weed infestations other than those specific for their respective cropping systems. Furthermore, willow cultivations in agriculture contribute to floristic diversity at the landscape scale.

Key words:

, , , , , , , , , , ,