Tag Archives: slurry

331-342 M. Luna-del Risco, A. Normak and K. Orupõld
Biochemical methane potential of different organic wastes and energy crops from Estonia
Abstract |

Biochemical methane potential of different organic wastes and energy crops from Estonia

M. Luna-del Risco¹, A. Normak¹ and K. Orupõld¹²

¹Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences. Kreutzwaldi 5, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
²Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences
e-mail: 1 mario.luna@emu.ee, 1 argo.normak@emu.ee, 1,2 kaja.orupold@emu.ee

Abstract:

 The biochemical methane potential (BMP) of different Estonian substrates as alternative sources for biogas production was studied. For this purpose, the BMP test was carried out in batch mode at mesophilic temperature (36°C). Substrates were divided into 2 groups: agricultural substrates (silage, hay, cattle and pig slurry) and food industry residues (milk, brewery and cereal industry residues). Methane yields obtained were between 286–319 L kgVS-1 for silage and hay, 238–317 L kgVS-1 for animal slurry and 272–714 L kgVS-1 for agro-industrial wastes. The highest methane yield was obtained from sour cream (714    L kgVS-1), the lowest (238 L kgVS-1) from cattle slurry. In overall, our results suggest that all tested substrates can be treated anaerobically and are potential sources for the production of methane.

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387-396 K. Tamm and R. Vettik
Case study: Economics of spring feeding in grassland
Abstract |
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Case study: Economics of spring feeding in grassland

K. Tamm and R. Vettik

Estonian Research Institute of Agriculture, Teaduse 13, Saku, Estonia;e-mail: Kalvi.Tamm@neti.ee

Abstract:

Change in world energy prices influences the price of mineral fertilisers. To meet the globally growing need for food farmers are extending the production of milk and meat, facilitating thereby an increase in manure production. The distance of the grassland from the farm centre and fertiliser prices influences farmers’ choices regarding the art and logistics of fertilising. The aim of this study is to compose a calculation model to compare the economic aspects of different fertilising options considering the grassland distance and the art of fertilising. The model contains components from the method applied to evaluate the rationality of exploitation of a field, considering the costs pertaining to field distance. Spring N feeding of grassland was simulated and five technologies were compared with the model.In calculations it was presumed that manure comes from a farm’s own production and thecosts arise only from hauling and distribution. In comparison with mineral fertiliser, these costs increase with driving distance; therefore it is economical to use only manure near the farm compound. In average Estonian forage production conditions, the N rate 75 kg ha-1 minimum value using cattle slurry distribution with a shallow injection system is more economical than using mineral fertiliser.It can be also concluded that compared to a distributor, using a tank truck for haulingslurry is beneficial on farther parcels (under the conditions in the simulation, farther than 4.2 5 km), as in those cases the hourly operation cost of the slurry distributor is very high.

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