Tag Archives: sowing time

347-354 R. Kosteckas, V. Liakas, A. Šiuliauskas, V. Rauckis,E. Liakienė, E. Jakienė
Effect of Pinolen on winter rape seed losses in relation to maturity
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Effect of Pinolen on winter rape seed losses in relation to maturity

R. Kosteckas², V. Liakas¹, A. Šiuliauskas¹, V. Rauckis²,E. Liakienė¹, E. Jakienė¹

¹Lithuanian University of Agriculture, Studentų str. 11, Akademija, Kaunas distr., LT-53361,Lithuania; e-mail: vytautas.liakas@gmail.com
²UAB “Kustodija”, Laisvės pr. 117A, Vilnius, LT-06118, Lithuania;e-mail: raimondas@kustodija.lt

Abstract:

Research objective: To determine the effect of Pinolen (Aventrol) and carbamate solutions on winter rape seed yields under Lithuanian conditions. Research place and time: Bariunai agricultural holding, Joniskis region., Lithuania. Trials were carried out in 2007–2008. Trial field soil: JDg8-K(LVg-p-w-cc) Calc(ar)i-Epihypogleyic Luvisols. Research methods: Field trials, and biometric analysis of rape plants. Research data evaluation: Two-year research data confirmed the hypothesis of the authors that, in the winter rape crop, leaf-spray fertilization with Pinolen (0.5–1.0 l ha-1) solutions three weeks before crop maturity results in the formation of an elastic capsule around the siliques and prevents them from splitting open with consequent loss of seed. Pinolen efficacy is greater in disease or pest damaged crops, and crops harvested late. From the economic and labour planning points of view, leaf-spray fertilization of winter rape with Pinolen should be combined with additional leaf-spray fertilization with carbamate solutions (20 kg ha-1). Leaf-spray fertilization of winter rape with Pinolen (1.0 l ha-1) + carbamate (20 kg ha-1) solutions resulted in seed yield increases: in the 2007 trial by 0.64 and in the 2008 trial by 0.320 t ha-1. Of the total seed augmentation, the Pinolen effect accounted for 33.3%. The protective efficacy of the capsule starts to decrease five weeks after leaf spray fertilization of the crop with these solutions. Key words: winter rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera), Pinolen, Carbamate, seed loss, seed productivityINTRODUCTION

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436-443 B. Petkeviciene
The effects of climate factors on sugar beet early sowing timing
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The effects of climate factors on sugar beet early sowing timing

B. Petkeviciene

Rumokai Research Station of the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculturepost LT-4293 Zalioji, district Vilkaviskis, Lithuanian;tel: +370-342-49422, +370-342-49435; e-mail: rumokai@post.omnitel.net

Abstract:

Important environmental variables that affect determination of sugar beet growing processes are temperature, precipitation and soil moisture. The optimal time for sugar beet sowing was determined in the variety testing trial conducted at the Rumokai Research Station of the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture during the period 2000–2006. This time was found to be when the mean daily temperature for three subsequent days reached the limit of base air temperatures (> 10ºC). The sowing time was found to strongly correlate (r = 0.9*) with the amount of precipitation and accumulated base temperatures (> 5ºC) in March and May. The potential of sugar beet root biomass and white sugar correlated moderately strongly with the duration of the growing season (r = 0.55 and 0.62) and sowing time (r = −0.64 and −0.70).Data from the sowing timing trial averaged over the period 2000–2004 suggests that in thecase of early sowing the soil moisture at sowing depth was 16.3. With the delay of sowing soil moisture decreased. At early sowing the stand density was by 3.3  lower compared with the average (99,900 plants ha-1). One week’s delay in sowing reduced roots by 4.7 t ha-1 and white sugar 0.9 t ha-1 and increased alpha amino nitrogen content in roots by 2.58 mg 100g-1.

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253–264 A. Svirskis
Investigation of amaranth cultivation and utilisation in Lithuania
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Investigation of amaranth cultivation and utilisation in Lithuania

A. Svirskis

Šiauliai University, P. Višinskio 25, Šiauliai, Lithuania; e-mail: selekcentras@lzi.lt

Abstract:

Studies of amaranth (Amaranthus spp.) collections have been carried out at the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture since 1978. During the period of 1998–2001, 13 varieties and populations of amaranth and some parameters of amaranth growing technology (sowing time, seed rate, row spacing, etc.) were investigated. The amaranth was grown in the six-course perennial grass breeding crop rotation after ploughed-in first year clover, sown after black fallow without additional fertilising and pesticides.
Preliminary amaranth growing technology was elaborated. The highest yield was produced when amaranth had been sown in the middle of May, at a seed rate of 2–4 kg ha-1, with row spacings of 50 cm and thrashed dry after severe frosts (-3…-5°C). The technology needs further improvement, and it is especially necessary to investigate fertilisation of amaranth in ecological and conventional farming systems.
Three amaranth varieties – ‘Raudonukai’, ‘Geltonukai’ and ‘Rausvukai’ – were registered in Lithuania in 2001. It is necessary to continue selection of amaranth species and varieties best suited for local conditions and investigate possibilities for use of amaranth green material and seed for food, feed, and energy production.

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