Tag Archives: sunflower oil

688-695 V. Dubrovskis, I. Plume and I. Straume
Anaerobic co-fermentation of molasses and oil with straw pellets
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Anaerobic co-fermentation of molasses and oil with straw pellets

V. Dubrovskis*, I. Plume and I. Straume

Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Institute of Energetics, Cakstes blvd. 5, LV3001 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: vilisd@inbox.lv

Abstract:

The average grain and straw production in Latvia is increasing in last decade. Straw is not always managed properly and its utilisation in biogas plants can be considered as an alternative. Straw is not the best feedstock for methane production, because it has high C/N ratio. Co-fermentation with other biomass with higher N content can improve the methane production. Purpose of investigation is to evaluate the wheat straw pellets biomass suitability for production of the methane and effect of its co-fermentation with molasses, fried sunflower oil and catalyst Metaferm. The anaerobic digestion process for biogas production was investigated in 0.75 L digesters, operated in batch mode at temperature 38 ± 1.0°C. The average biogas yield per unit of dry organic matter added from digestion of wheat straw pellets was 0.540 L g-1DOM and methane yield was 0.285 L g-1DOM. Average biogas yield from co-fermentation of wheat straw pellets and molasses was 0.777 L g-1DOM and methane yield was 0.408 L g-1DOM. Average biogas yield from fermentation of wheat straw pellets with 1ml Metaferm was 0.692 L g-1DOM and methane yield was 0.349 L g-1DOM. Average biogas yield from co-fermentation of wheat straw pellets and sunflowers oil was 1.041 L g-1DOM and methane yield was 0.639 L g-1DOM. All investigated biomasses can be used for methane production.

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1399–1410 L. Nilova, T. Pilipenko, and S. Malyutenkova
An investigation into the effects of bioactive substances from vegetable oils on the antioxidant properties of bakery products
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An investigation into the effects of bioactive substances from vegetable oils on the antioxidant properties of bakery products

L. Nilova,* T. Pilipenko, and S. Malyutenkova

Peter the Great St Petersburg Polytechnic University, Institute of Industrial Management, Economics and Trade, Graduate School of Commodity and Service, Novorossiyskaya Street 50, 194021 St Petersburg, Russia
* Correspondence: nilova_l_p@mai.ru

Abstract:

This article discusses ways in which the antioxidant capacity of bakery products (otherwise referred to as ‘BPs’) can be increased by adding various types of vegetable oil to the dough: chosen as test oil was unrefined rice bran oil, unrefined pumpkin seed oil, and refined and deodorised sunflower oil. The authors conducted a study of fatty acid compositions and biologically active substances to be found in vegetable oils. The antioxidant properties of vegetable oils were analysed according to the following characteristics: the formation of the primary (peroxide value) and secondary (anisidine value) oxidation products; the oxidation coefficient (IR spectroscopy) which can be determined in the process of applying thermal treatment (with five hours of heating at 120 °C), which leads to the Vitamin E being destroyed. The biochemical composition of vegetable oils affected their resistance to the thermal oxidation process in the following sequence: unrefined rice bran oil > unrefined pumpkin seed oil > refined and deodorised sunflower oil. BPs were made from wheat flour dough with the addition of 4% of the corresponding vegetable oil and 5% of sugar, and were baked at two temperature regimes: at 200 °C and at 220 °C. The antioxidant activity of the BPs was determined by means of two methods: by chemiluminescence, and by DPPH radical assay. The antioxidant activity of the BPs varies depending on the vegetable oil being used, with the differences being revealed in the following way: BPs with unrefined pumpkin seed oil > BPs with unrefined rice bran oil > BPs with refined and deodorised sunflower oil. Any increase in the baking temperature reduced the antioxidant activity of the BPs; the antioxidant properties in the crust and the crumb were reduced at differing rates.

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