Tag Archives: turnip rape

592-598 Henriksen, B.I.F., A.R. Lundon, E. Prestløkken,U. Abrahamsen and R. Eltun
Nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops, and quality of potential organic protein feed for ruminants and poultry
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Nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops, and quality of potential organic protein feed for ruminants and poultry

Henriksen, B.I.F.¹, A.R. Lundon², E. Prestløkken³,U. Abrahamsen² and R. Eltun²

¹Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Organic Food and FarmingDivision, Gunnars vei 6, N–6630 Tingvoll, Norway; britt.henriksen@bioforsk.no
²Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Arable Crops Division,Rute 509, N–2849 Kapp, Norway
³Felleskjøpet Fôrutvikling, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway

Abstract:

The aim of organic farming husbandry is to be entirely based on an organically produced diet. Pea is the most commonly cultivated protein rich crop in organic agriculture in Norway. However other high protein crops with complementary properties are needed to meet the nutritional demands in feeds for ruminants, pigs and poultry. An ongoing study in Bioforsk aims to develop cultivation practices on nutrient supply for organic oilseed crops and to establish knowledge on the feed quality of organically grown oilseed crops used as protein feed. It appears that spring turnip rape (Brassica rapa L. var. oleifera) and Camelina (Camelina sativa L.) can both be successfully cultivated with different levels of supplied nitrogen and sulphur. The nutrient value of organic spring turnip rape seems to be equivalent to conventional protein crops. Camelina can be an alternative in organic production, due to fewer problems with harmful pests compared with the traditional oilseed crops rape and turnip rape. Oilseed cake of turnip rape has higher protein and mineral content than the seed, and can be an interesting addition in feed ration for both ruminants and poultry, especially in combination with field pea.

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