Tag Archives: ventilator.

207-214 M. Dubeňová, T. Šima, R. Gálik, Š. Mihina, G. Vagač and Š. Boďo
Reduction of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide in the pig barn piggery by different ventilation system intensities
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Reduction of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide in the pig barn piggery by different ventilation system intensities

M. Dubeňová¹, T. Šima²⋅*, R. Gálik¹, Š. Mihina¹, G. Vagač³ and Š. Boďo¹

¹Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Production Engineering, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic 2Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Machines and Production Systems, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic; *Correspondence: tomasko.sima@gmail.com 3Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Agrobiology and Food Resources, Department of Animal Husbandry, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic

Abstract:

Agriculture, especially animal production, is one of the most important factors influencing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and causing global warming. The ventilation system in a piggery has a significant impact to carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations. The concentrations of these gases in pig housing also affect the air quality and welfare of animals. The aim of the paper was to analyze the effect of ventilation system intensity on the concentration of CO2 and N2O in a piggery. An experiment was carried out at the Experimental Centre for Livestock at the Department of Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Agrobiology and Food Resources, the Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovakia. The concentrations were measured by a photoacoustic field gas monitor INNOVA 1412 connected to a multipoint sampler INNOVA 1309. Three levels of ventilation system intensity were used: low, medium and high. Fattening pigs, the Large White breed were housed in the piggery. For our experiment, three sensors were used inside and two sensors outside the barn. Based on the gathered data, statistically significant differences were found between different ventilation system intensities at a 95.0% confidence level. The concentration of gases fluctuates during day time interval and, based on the results, it is possible to set up a ventilation system intensity to create the best possible air quality in a building for pigs.

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