Tag Archives: zeolite

359–366 B. Cemek, E. Kucuktopcu and Y. Demir
Determination of spatial distribution of ammonia levels in broiler houses
Abstract |
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Determination of spatial distribution of ammonia levels in broiler houses

B. Cemek*, E. Kucuktopcu and Y. Demir

Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural
Structures and Irrigation, TR 55139 Samsun, Turkey
*Correspondence:bcemek@omu.edu.tr

Abstract:

Ammonia concentration plays a significant role in broiler performance. High concentration of ammonia impairs the immune system and increases cases of respiratory disease in birds. Ammonia concentration can be reduced using various chemical additives such as zeolite. In the present study, spatial variability of ammonia concentration was investigated and analysed in two broiler houses. In House 1 (H1) sawdust only was used as litter material whilst sawdust used together with zeolite was used in House 2 (H2). Ammonia concentration measurements were taken from 21 points in each of the broiler houses. The readings were recorded at on a weekly basis using birds’ height as height measurement bases. In order to create spatial distribution maps, Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) methods were used and analysed. The performances of these techniques were assessed by using validation test methods (root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE)) with the best performing method (lowest RMSE and MAE) being selected for creating ammonia spatial distribution maps. The results indicated that spatial ammonia distribution is more uniform in H2 compared to H1. It was also observed that ammonia levels were lower in H2 than H1. The presence of zeolite as a litter addition can be attributed to study findings positively affected the broiler performance. It was considered that using zeolite with sawdust as litter material significantly reduced ammonia concentration. In H1, higher ammonia concentrations of greater than 25 ppm were recorded near ventilation fans and at the centre of the house. Because of this it is recommended to install additional fans at middle of the house for remove harmful ammonia.

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337-347 P. Kuttner,, A.D. Weißböck, V. Leitner and A. Jäger
Examination of commercial additives for biogas production
Abstract |

Examination of commercial additives for biogas production

P. Kuttner¹,*, A.D. Weißböck¹, V. Leitner² and A. Jäger¹

¹University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, 4600 Wels, Austria
²Energy Institute at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz, Austria *Correspondence: paul.kuttner@fh-wels.at

Abstract:

The formation of biogas from biomass is a complex process with a multitude of variable process parameters. Stability of biogas production and production rate can be vastly improved by keeping these parameters close to their optimum. One possibility to achieve this is by use of additives. In Germany alone there currently are over 250 additives on the market which demonstrates the demand for optimisation of biogas plants. The effects of these additives are hardly investigated and can only be evaluated by costly, time consuming tests (e.g. continuous anaerobic digestion experiments). A new, fast and easy to handle method was developed to evaluate some of the effects of additives. To verify the method trace elements, organic acids, FOS/TAC, ions and cations were quantified. Three additives were tested: The addition of a commercial zeolite increased biogas production by 15%. Calcium carbonate increased performance by 8% after 16 days. No negative effect on biogas production could be observed for the addition of 0.03 and 0.06 g l-1 of iron(III) chloride, commonly used to reduce hydrogen sulphide concentration in biogas.

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