Tag Archives: alternative building material

xxx P.F.P. Ferraz, D.H.S. Abreu, B.N. Huallpa, L.S. Santana, D. Cecchin, G.F. Rabelo, G. Rossi and M. Barbari
Acoustic analysis of cement composites with lignocellulosic residues
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Acoustic analysis of cement composites with lignocellulosic residues

P.F.P. Ferraz¹*, D.H.S. Abreu², B.N. Huallpa¹, L.S. Santana¹, D. Cecchin³, G.F. Rabelo⁴, G. Rossi⁵ and M. Barbari⁵

¹Federal University of Lavras, Agricultural Engineering Department, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, CEP 37200-000 Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
²University of Campinas, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (FEEC), Comunication Department, Av. Albert Einstein – 400, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, District Barão Geraldo, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
³Federal Fluminense University, Campus Praia Vermelha, Rua Passo da Pátria, 156, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
⁴Federal University of Lavras, Automatic Department, Campus Universitário,
PO Box 3037, CEP 37200-000 Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
⁵University of Florence, Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry, Via San Bonaventura, IT13-50145 Firenze, Italy
*Correspondence: paricia.ponciano@ufla.br

Abstract:

The concept of environmental sustainability has been seeking a way to develop projects that reduce the impacts provided by agricultural development and the excessive consumption of natural resources. However, there is still little knowledge about the acoustic  insulation/absorption behaviour of lignocellulosic materials. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the acoustic properties of five cement panels reinforced with the following lignocellulosic materials: eucalyptus, sugarcane bagasse, coconut shell, coffee husk, and banana pseudostem, which ones have as a reference a commercial plaster used as sealing in civil constructions. The proposed panels were produced with each lignocellulosic material residue. It was produced three replicates for each type including plaster (being 18 panels in total). The sound insertion loss (SIL) measurement of the above-mentioned panels have been performed using an acoustical treated inexpensive facility developed based on the literature. The characterization of the acoustic behaviour of the studied materials were analysed according to the IEC (61260-1). The acoustic  measurements have been done in the range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz and the analysis in octave bands have been performed. To make the analysis easier, the overall range of frequencies mentioned above was divided as ‘low’, ‘middle’ and ‘high’ ranges. Additionally, the measurement of thickness, density and porosity structure parameters of the lignocellulosic samples have been performed. According to the results and doing a trade-off analysis, the eucalyptus presented the overall best performance considering the overall range of analysis, being the banana pseudostem and sugarcane bagasse materials as good competitors.

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797-805 P.F.P. Ferraz, R.F. Mendes, G.A.S. Ferraz, V.R. Carvalho, M.R.C. Avelino, C.R.P. Narciso, T.M.C. Eugênio, V.G. Cadavid and G. Bambi
Thermal analysis of cement panels with lignocellulosic materials for building
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Thermal analysis of cement panels with lignocellulosic materials for building

P.F.P. Ferraz¹, R.F. Mendes², G.A.S. Ferraz¹, V.R. Carvalho², M.R.C. Avelino², C.R.P. Narciso³, T.M.C. Eugênio³, V.G. Cadavid⁴ and G. Bambi⁵

¹Federal University of Lavras, Department of Agricultural Engineering, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
²Federal University of Lavras, Department of Engineering, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
³Federal University of Lavras, Department of Forest Sciences, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
⁴Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Faculty of Agrarians Science, Medellín, Colombia
⁵University of Firenze, Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), Via San Bonaventura 13, IT50145 Firenze, Italy
*Correspondence: patricia.ponciano@ufla.br

Abstract:

The use of lignocellulosic material residue in cement composites can be considered as a good option because they allow good thermal behaviour. This paper aimed to compare three kinds of cement panels reinforced with different lignocellulosic materials (Coffee husk, Coconut shell, and Banana pseudostem) based on their thermal properties. To produce each panel, the methodology suggested by Souza (1994) was used. Six replicates of each lignocellulosic panel with dimensions of 7.0×7.5 were evaluated. The thermal analysis was performed in a chamber composed of MDP (medium density particleboard). The chamber contained the heat source (incandescent lamp) connected to a thermostat that maintained the temperature at 48.0 °C. The porosity and thickness of the panels and the thermal behaviour of each sample panel (thermal conductivity, resistivity, resistance, and transmittance) and the difference in temperature of both sides of the panel were evaluated. The temperature difference to stabilization was obtained after a sampling time of 200 minutes, with 1,000 readings of 12 s each. Although all the panels were submitted under the same temperature, the inner and external superficial temperatures of the coffee husk panels reached smaller values. Besides, coconut and banana pseudostem panels presented the best results of thermal transmittance and thermal resistance. Thus, coconut shell panels present the best thermal performance, which means that this panel might be an attractive alternative building material, in terms of heat insulation for indoor applications.

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806–814 P.F.P. Ferraz, R.F. Mendes, G.A.S. Ferraz, F.A. Damasceno, I.M.A. Silva, L.E.V.S.B. Vaz, L.M. Mendes, D. Cecchin and J.O. Castro
Comparison between the thermal properties of cement composites using infrared thermal images
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Comparison between the thermal properties of cement composites using infrared thermal images

P.F.P. Ferraz¹, R.F. Mendes², G.A.S. Ferraz¹, F.A. Damasceno², I.M.A. Silva², L.E.V.S.B. Vaz², L.M. Mendes³, D. Cecchin⁴ and J.O. Castro²

¹Federal University of Lavras, Department of Agricultural Engineering, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
²Federal University of Lavras, Department of Engineering, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
³Federal University of Lavras, Department of Forest Sciences, Campus Universitário, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
⁴Federal University Fluminense, Department of Agricultural Engineering and Environment, Campus Praia Vermelha, São Domingos, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
*Correspondence: patricia.ponciano@ufla.br

Abstract:

The use of agribusiness residual lignocellulosic fibres can be a good alternative in the development of lignocellulosic composites. The current work aimed to investigate the thermal performance of cement-based composites with lignocellulosic materials: Eucalyptus, sugarcane bagasse, coconut fibre in comparison with commercial gypsum board to be used as internal partitions of the building using infrared thermal images. Three repetitions for each kind of lignocellulosic material were made, and three commercial gypsum boards were used. In the production of the panels, the following parameters were applied: material and cement ratio, 1:2.75; water and cement ratio, 1:2.5; hydration water rate of 0.25; additive, 4% (based on cement mass). The calculations were performed for a nominal panel density of 1,200 kg m. The thermal analysis was performed in a chamber composed of MDP (Medium-Density Particleboard) and with an internal layer of rock wool and the heat source (thermal resistance). For the superficial temperature measurement, a FLIR E75 camera was used to capture the infrared images. When the internal temperature of the chamber stabilized at 50 °C, an infrared thermal image was collected from each side of the composite. Thermal properties were analysed: thermal conductivity, resistivity, resistance, and transmittance. Based on the results, sugar cane cement composites were characterized by higher values of thermal conductivity. Related to thermal resistivity, thermal resistance, and thermal transmittance, only the coconut panel presented similar behaviour to the commercial gypsum board. Thus, cement composite using coconut can be a potential alternative that might solve energy and environmental concerns simultaneously.

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