Tag Archives: anthocyanins

xxx C.G. Comar, M. dos S. Queiroz, M.M. de Andrade, J.R. Trettel and H.M. Magalhães
Copper modulates the biochemical and enzymatic activity and growth of tomato cultivars grown in vitro
Abstract |
Full text PDF (746 KB)

Copper modulates the biochemical and enzymatic activity and growth of tomato cultivars grown in vitro

C.G. Comar¹, M. dos S. Queiroz², M.M. de Andrade², J.R. Trettel¹ and H.M. Magalhães¹*

¹Paranaense University – UNIPAR, Graduate Program in Biotechnology Applied to Agriculture, 87502-210, Umuarama, Paraná, Brazil
²Paranaense University – UNIPAR, Agronomy, 87502-210, Umuarama, Paraná, Brazil
*Correspondence: helidamara@prof.unipar.br

Abstract:

Copper (Cu) is a micronutrient that is neglected for tomato growth. This study sought to identify the effects of exposure to Cu on the growth and biochemical activity of two tomato cultivars. Tomato seeds of ‘Carolina’ and ‘Cereja’ cultivars were disinfected and inoculated in MS medium plus copper sulfate concentrations (CuSO4) (default MS, 25, 50, and 100 μm) and had their growth monitored for 30 days. It was estimated that the growth and biomass accumulation of tomato plants ‘Carolina’ and ‘Cereja’, both from the aerial part and the roots, were benefited by 25 e 50 μm of CuSO4. However, it was observed that these concentrations were inefficient in controlling hyperhydricity and leaf deformation. There was a reduction of these phenomena in the treatment with 100 μm, in both cultivars. Tomato of ‘Carolina’ cultivar subjected to 100 μm showed an increase in anthocyanins and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the root system. There was a reduction of catalase (CAT) activity in shoots exposed to Cu. ‘Cereja’ tomatoes subjected to 100 μm showed an increase in CAT and SOD activity in shoots and roots, respectively. It was concluded that the ‘Carolina’ and ‘Cereja’ tomatoes have their growth impaired when exposed to 100 μm CuSO4. Concentrations higher than 50 μm of CuSO4 cause an increase in the antioxidant activity in the shoot of tomato plants from the ‘Carolina’ cultivar. Concentrations higher than 50 μm CuSO4 increase SOD activity in the root system of tomato plants from the ‘Cereja’ cultivar.

Key words:

, , , ,




2715–2726 A. Kikas,, R. Rätsep,, H. Kaldmäe, A. Aluvee and A.-V. Libek
Comparison of Polyphenols and Anthocyanin Content of Different Blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) Cultivars at the Polli Horticultural Research Centre in Estonia
Abstract |
Full text PDF (408 KB)

Comparison of Polyphenols and Anthocyanin Content of Different Blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) Cultivars at the Polli Horticultural Research Centre in Estonia

A. Kikas¹,*, R. Rätsep¹,², H. Kaldmäe¹, A. Aluvee¹ and A.-V. Libek¹

¹Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Polli Horticultural Research Centre, Uus 2, Polli, EE69108 Viljandi county, Estonia
²Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, ERA Chair for Food (By-) Products Valorisation Technologies, Fr. R. Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51006 Tartu, Estonia

Abstract:

The evaluation of blackcurrant cultivars and their fruit properties at the Polli Horticultural Research Centre has been active since 1945. In addition to the assessment of biological and economic properties of cultivars, it is essential to pay attention to fruit quality. In 2014, the laboratory building of Polli Horticultural Research Centre was reconstructed within the PlantValor competence centre project, enabling to introduce HPLC methods for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in fruit quality analysis. In 2017 and 2018, the fruit quality of 37 blackcurrant cultivars of different geographical origin (Belarus, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Russia, Scotland, Sweden and Ukraine) was analysed. All cultivars were grown in the genetic resources collection (2008–2019) located at the Polli Horticultural Research Centre. The main aim of the study was to analyse the content of polyphenols and anthocyanins for selecting suitable blackcurrant genotypes for breeding programmes, fruit production and possible product development. In two consecutive years of the study, the total polyphenols content in the fruits of different cultivars varied 290–634 mg 100 g-1 fresh weight (fw) and the anthocyanins 183–471 mg 100 g-1 fw.

Key words:

, , , ,




1976-1985 G.N. Chupakhina, M. Shansky, A. Parol, N.Y. Chupakhina, P.V. Feduraev, L.N. Skrypnik and P.V. Maslennikov
Comparative characteristics of antioxidant capacity of some forage plants of the Baltic Sea Region (a case study of the Kaliningrad Region and Estonia)
Abstract |
Full text PDF (964 KB)

Comparative characteristics of antioxidant capacity of some forage plants of the Baltic Sea Region (a case study of the Kaliningrad Region and Estonia)

G.N. Chupakhina¹*, M. Shansky², A. Parol², N.Y. Chupakhina³, P.V. Feduraev¹, L.N. Skrypnik¹ and P.V. Maslennikov¹

¹Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Universitetskaya street 2, RU236040 Kaliningrad, Russia
²Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51014 Tartu, Estonia
³Kaliningrad State Technical University, Sovetskiy prospect 1, RU236000 Kaliningrad, Russia
*Correspondence: natalie-tch@yandex.ru

Abstract:

In this paper, we investigate changes in the antioxidant levels (anthocyanins, leucoanthocyanins, catechins) and the total water-soluble antioxidants capacity in forage plants in relation to their geography, i.e. proximity to northern or coastal areas. We demonstrate that the antioxidant content increases in unfavorable conditions, being higher in plants growing closer to the sea and in northernmost plants. Thus, since the total water-soluble antioxidants capacity is influenced by ecological factors, it may be used as one of the indicators in complex environmental assessment.

Key words:

, , ,




1330–1347 M. Kremenevskaya, O. Sosnina, A. Semenova, I. Udina and A.Glazova,
Meat industry by-products for berry crops and food production quality improvement
Abstract |
Full text PDF (535 KB)

Meat industry by-products for berry crops and food production quality improvement

M. Kremenevskaya¹, O. Sosnina¹, A. Semenova², I. Udina³ and A.Glazova¹,*

¹ ITMO University, Faculty of Food Biotechnologies and Engineering, Department of Meat and Fish Processing and Refrigeration, 49 Kronverksky Pr., St. Petersburg, 197101, Russia
² The Gorbatov’s All-Russian Meat Research Institute (VNIIMP), Deputy director for scientific work, 26 Talalikhina Str., Моscow, 109316, Russia
³ LLC JTI Russia, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs Department, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs Manager, 1st Krasnogvardeysky proezd, Moscow, 123100, Russia
*Correspondence: sosnina.olga.ITMO@yandex.ru

Abstract:

This paper describes the problem of obtaining a hydrolysate from animal industry byproducts. A new innovative protein-containing product has been created to stimulate the growth and development of berry and fruit crops. The paper describes a technique for a plant treatment with a hydrolysate invented, its concentrations being determined. We have studied the chemical composition of fruit and berry raw materials in a native form after rapid freezing and refregiration. The possibility of creating a new confectionery product made from quick-frozen berries treated with a stimulator is predetermined.

Key words:

, , ,




1316–1329 L. Klavins, J. Kviesis, M. Klavins
Comparison of methods of extraction of phenolic compounds from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) press residues
Abstract |
Full text PDF (525 KB)

Comparison of methods of extraction of phenolic compounds from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) press residues

L. Klavins, J. Kviesis, M. Klavins*

University of Latvia, 19 Raina Blvd., LV–1586, Riga, Latvia
*Correspondence: maris.klavins@lu.lv

Abstract:

American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon L.) contain significant quantities of
various phenolic compounds. Most of these compounds are recovered when berry juice is
produced. However, a considerable part of polyphenols remain in berry press residues and are
discarded as food industry waste. The aim of the study was to compare the methods of extraction
of polyphenols (ultrasound, microwave-assisted, Soxhlet) from press residues of American
cranberry. The impact of main extraction parameters (e.g., extraction time, solid/solvent ratio,
solvent type) on the yield of extracted polyphenols. Ultrasound-assisted extraction showed the
highest potential from all studied methods, given its fast, convenient use and low cost. Aqueous
ethanol and methanol in the presence of acid (anthocyanin extractions should be assisted with
trifluoroacetic acid, polyphenol extractions – with HCl) were assessed as the best solvents for
extraction. The obtained extracts were characterised using the Folin-Ciocaulteu method for
determination of total phenolics and the pH-differential method for determination of total
anthocyanins, and UPLC–PDA was used to determine the content of individual anthocyanins.
Cyanidin-3-O-arabinoside, peonidin-3-O-galactoside, peonidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-
O-arabinoside were identified as the main anthocyanins in cranberry press residue extracts.

Key words:

, , , , ,




892-899 D. Arslan
Effects of degradation preventive agents on storage stability of anthocyanins in sour cherry concentrate
Abstract |
Full text PDF (438 KB)

Effects of degradation preventive agents on storage stability of anthocyanins in sour cherry concentrate

D. Arslan

Division of Food Sciences, Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya, Turkey e-mail: dears@konya.edu.tr

Abstract:

In this study the effects of sugar (sucrose, 25%), gallic acid (700 mg kg-1) and ascorbic acid (700 mg kg-1) were used in sour cherry concentrate in order to prevent the degradation of main anthocyanin compounds (cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside (Cy-3GR), cyanidin-3-rutinoside (Cy-3R) and cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3G)) which are natural bioactive pigments responsible for red, blue and purple color of many fruits and vegetables. Thermal degradation of anthocyanins was evaluated by determination of anthocyanin content and calculation of the reaction rate constant, half-life of degradation, activation energy. Anthocyanin content decreased at all of the storage temperatures, as an example; there were 75, 51 and 55% reductions in Cy-3G contents of control samples (with no preventive agent) stored at 45, 24 and 4°C, respectively. The values of half-life time were above 200 days in most cases at all storage temperatures for sugar treated samples. Cy-3-GR (activation energy values 35.6-84.4 kJ mol-1) was found to be the most unstable among the other anthocyanins. The most contributing agent on anthocyanin stability was sugar, whereas ascorbic acid exhibited the lowest effect in terms of preventing anthocyanin degradation.

Key words:

, , ,