Tag Archives: antimicrobial agents

xxx A.R. Mikaelyan, B.G. Babayan, A.A. Vartanyan and H.V. Tokmajyan
Tartaric acid synthetic derivatives effect on phytopathogenic bacteria
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Tartaric acid synthetic derivatives effect on phytopathogenic bacteria

A.R. Mikaelyan¹, B.G. Babayan², A.A. Vartanyan³* and H.V. Tokmajyan⁴

¹National Polytechnic University of Armenia, Teryan Srt., 105, AM0009 Yerevan, Armenia
²Armbiotechnology Scientific and Production Center, Gyurjyan Str., 14, AM0056 Yerevan, Armenia
³3Moscow Aviation Institute (National Research University), Volokolamskoe highway 4, RU125993 Moscow, Russia
⁴Shushi University of Technology, Armenakyan Str., 125, AM0047 Yerevan, Armenia
*Correspondence: arevshadvartanyan@mail.ru

Abstract:

The scientific goals of current research were devoted to targeted derivatization of natural tartaric acid (TA) for the enhancement of antimicrobial properties of it such as like the effects of them on multi-drug resistant phytopathogenic bacteria, depends to their structure features and the genetic parameters of studied microorganisms. The main utilitarian goal is to develop new class of antimicrobial biodegradable compounds with possible prospective application as moresafe alternative to traditional antibiotics applicable for: agriculture, horticulture, food industry as well as in medicine. These compounds were developed in basic research laboratory: ‘Agrarian Pesticide Creation and The Quality Control’ at National Polytechnic University of Armenia (NPUA). TA and tartrates are safe antimicrobial food additives. According to the results of in vitro studies, the synthesized cyclohexyl-, benzyl- and phenyl- derivatives of it in the form of amine complex salts (correspondently CAS, BAS and PhAS) and cyclic imides (correspondently CI, BI and PhI) are effective against the model multi-drug resistant strains of Gram-negative microorganisms. Bactericidal effects of TA derivatives were demonstrated on 19 model native soil strains of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas beticola (6 strains), X. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae (13 strains)representatives, which are differing in antibiotic resistance. Regarding the transformation results, the absence of transfer of resistance to TA imides and amine complex salts by plasmids, makes them promising objects for further research. Primary studies have not shown any antibacterial effect on various non-pathogenic soil bacteria (Pseudomonas chlororaphis, P. taetrolens, etc.). The described compounds are recommended for further more detailed toxicological studies.

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xxx U. Antone, I. Eihvalde, L. Liepa, A. Ilgaza, M. Zolovs and J. Liepins
Whey permeate-derived milk acidifier for dairy calves
Abstract |
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Whey permeate-derived milk acidifier for dairy calves

U. Antone¹*, I. Eihvalde²³, L. Liepa⁴, A. Ilgaza⁵, M. Zolovs⁶⁷ and J. Liepins⁸

¹Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies (LLU), Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Food Technology, 22 Rigas Str., LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
²LLU, Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Animal Sciences of LLU, 2 Liela Str.,
LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
³Training and Research Farm SIA “Vecauce” of LLU, 11A Akademijas Str., LV-3708 Auce, Auces lauku teritorija, Latvia
⁴LLU, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Clinical Institute, 8 Kristapa Helmana Str.,
LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
⁵LLU, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Preclinical Institute, 8 Kristapa Helmana Str., LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
⁶Daugavpils University, Department of Biosystematics, Institute of Life Sciences and Technology, 1a Parades Str., LV-5401 Daugavpils, Latvia
⁷Riga Stradins University, Statistics Unit, 14 Balozu Str., LV-1007 Riga, Latvia
⁸University of Latvia (LU), Institute of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 1 Jelgavas Str., LV-1050 Riga, Latvia
*Correspondence: u.antone@gmail.com

Abstract:

A milk acidifier obtained from whey permeate fermenting it with dairy propionic acid bacteria was tested in this study to evaluate the effects of milk acidification on the health and growth performance of pre-weaned dairy calves. The study consisted of 30 neonatal Holstein female calves, allocated to three treatments fed unacidified (Control group) or acidified (EG-1 and EG-2 groups) pasteurised milk during the 7–75 day age. Control and EG-1 were fed milk by divided method three times daily till one month of age, then twice daily until weaning; EG-2 was basically fed by the undivided method – one week three times daily (7–14 day age), then once daily. Results demonstrate that animal general health status and faecal scores (FS) were good and the tested acidifier can be used for pre-weaned calf milk acidification. Biochemical and haematological indices of blood at the 30 and 60 day age were within normal reference values with both – divided and undivided – milk feeding methods. Mean live weight (LW; 106.6 ± 9.40 kg on average) and live weight gain (LWG; 911.33 ± 109.04 g day-1 on average) at weaning did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). Lower intake of starter feed associated with a larger amount of milk consumed was observed in EG-2 animals (P < 0.05). As the results observed regarding growth performance and health indices of all dietary treatment groups of calves were similar, we could anticipate that the acidification benefits would be greater when providing unpasteurised milk, or during the hottest weather when the risks of milk spoilage are greater.

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