Tag Archives: encapsulation

2156-2168 E.N. Shcherbakova, A.V. Shcherbakov, P.Yu. Rots, L.N. Gonchar, S.A. Mulina, L.M. Yahina, Yu.V. Lactionov and V.K. Chebotar
Inoculation technology for legumes based on alginate encapsulation
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Inoculation technology for legumes based on alginate encapsulation

E.N. Shcherbakova¹*, A.V. Shcherbakov¹, P.Yu. Rots², L.N. Gonchar³, S.A. Mulina¹, L.M. Yahina¹, Yu.V. Lactionov¹ and V.K. Chebotar¹

¹All-Russia research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology, Shosse Podbelskogo 3, RU196608 Pushkin, St. Petersburg, Russia
²Biocad Biotechnology Company, Sviazi street 34, Strelna, RU198515 St. Petersburg,
Russia
³National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Plant Science Department, Heroyiv Oborony street 15, UA03041 Kyiv, Ukraine
*Correspondence: alonagonchar@mail.ru

Abstract:

The main purpose of seeds inoculation is to provide the sufficient number of viable efficient bacteria that are able to actively colonize the plant roots immediately after germination. One of the promising forms of bacterial preparations is cells encapsulation in the polymer gel. Advantages of using alginate microspheres are slow, controlled release of bacteria, biodegradation in the soil and an increased shelf life. As a result of this study the effectiveness of using capsulated biopreparation was established to increase the nitrogen-fixing potential of legumes. The advantage in colonization activity is shown in comparison with other forms of the biopreparations due to the slow release of rhizobium from the capsules. The optimal composition for formulation is established which ensures the storage of biopreparation for more than 1 year. The prospect of using encapsulated biopreparations under adverse environmental conditions and for joint application with chemical pesticides and agrochemicals is analyzed.

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1475-1485 I. Sepelevs and G.A. Reineccius
Encapsulation of Gallic acid in solid lipid core surrounded with maltodextrin shell
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Encapsulation of Gallic acid in solid lipid core surrounded with maltodextrin shell

I. Sepelevs¹* and G.A. Reineccius²

¹Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Food Technology, Rigas street 22, LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
²University of Minnesota, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, 1334 Eckles Ave, MN 55108, St. Paul, USA
*Correspondence: igor_shepelev@inbox.lv

Abstract:

Multiple phase capsules had been prepared in a single spray drying process. The main goal of the present study was to investigate whether the conversion of a portion of the modified starch (wall material used in spray drying) to resistant starch (RS) would offer added protection of encapsulated material. To achieve this, dry gallic acid (GA; a model water soluble phenol compound used in the present study) was initially dispersed in palm oil and stabilized with Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate (PGPR 4175) as an emulsifier. This dispersion was homogenized with a modified starch (MS, dextrose equivalent of 15) solution, that was previously treated with high pressure and increased temperature to achieve starch retrogradation, and then spray dried. It was possible to produce only small amounts of RS from modified starch, varying from 0.1 to 0.2% of total carbohydrate content. GA content in the lipid phase of the capsule was determined by lipid droplet size in the O/W emulsion (the feeding solution), as smaller droplets results in the significantly bigger surface area, and more intensive GA diffusion from O to W phase. Maltodextrin shell wall was able to prevent leaking of the melted palm oil form the capsule core to the surface during seating tests, preventing agglomeration of capsules. This could be very important for the storage/transportation of capsules in the uncontrolled temperature conditions.

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