Tag Archives: fertiliser

676–686 V. Bulgakov, O. Adamchuk, S. Pascuzzi, F. Santoro and J. Olt
Research into engineering and operation parameters of mineral fertiliser application machine with new fertiliser spreading tools
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Research into engineering and operation parameters of mineral fertiliser application machine with new fertiliser spreading tools

V. Bulgakov¹, O. Adamchuk², S. Pascuzzi³, F. Santoro³ and J. Olt⁴*

¹National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, 15 Heroyiv Oborony Str., Kyiv, UA 03041, Ukraine
²National Scientific Centre, Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Electrification, 11 Vokzalna Str., Glevakcha 1, Vasylkiv District, UA 08631 Kyiv Region, Ukraine
³University of Bari Aldo Moro, Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Via Amendola, 165/A, IT 70125 Bari, Italy
⁴Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Technology, 56 Kreutzwaldi Str., Tartu, EE 51006, Estonia
*Correspondence: jyri.olt@emu.ee

Abstract:

The output capacity of the machine for top spreading the soil with solid mineral fertilisers can be raised by means of increasing its working width. The authors have carried out field trials and field experiment investigations with the MVU-8 granulated mineral fertilizer spreading machine equipped with two prototype units of the centrifugal fertiliser spreading tool, in which the axis can be tilted at different angles to the vertical line. In accordance with the results of the completed investigations, it has been established that setting the axial tilt angle of the centrifugal operating device in the fertiliser spreading tool within the range of 25–30° provides for achieving a productivity of the combined tractor-implement unit for applying mineral fertilisers at a level of 35–40 ha per working shift hour. The best performance in the fertiliser application with regard to both the working width and the fertiliser placing distribution uniformity is ensured at angles of inclination of the disc in the fertiliser spreading tool with respect to the horizontal plane within the range of 25–30°. At these angles, the uneven distribution of the fertiliser over the working width is equal to 19.2%, the uneven distribution of the fertiliser along the unit’s line of travel is equal to 8.9%, while the deviation in the dosage of the applied fertilisers from the set value is equal to 7.5%.

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468–477 D. Lazdiņa, I. Bebre, K. Dūmiņš, I. Skranda, A. Lazdins, J. Jansons and S. Celma
Wood ash – green energy production side product as fertilizer for vigorous forest plantations
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Wood ash – green energy production side product as fertilizer for vigorous forest plantations

D. Lazdiņa*, I. Bebre, K. Dūmiņš, I. Skranda, A. Lazdins, J. Jansons and S. Celma

Latvian State Forest Research Institute ‘Silava’, Riga str. 111, LV-2169 Salaspils, Latvia
*Correspondence: dagnija.lazdina@silava.lv

Abstract:

Notable amounts of wood ash containing plant macro and micronutrient elements in balanced proportions are produced in Latvia. If bioenergy production source product is plant material, and facilities are operating well, then ‘side product’ fermentation residues or wood ashes should not contain elements in toxic concentrations. Wood ash contains P and K which are lacking in acidic organic soils and could work as fertiliser as well as a long term liming agent, besides that, all micronutrient elements necessary for physiological processes are present in wood ash. Wood ash could also be used as ‘revitalization agents’ – fertilisers to improve the growth of plantation forests. The aim of this research is to find and describe the positive effect of wood ash fertilisers on Norway spruce (Picea abies) and other economically valuable tree species. Research results show positive wood ash application effect on tree growth and vitality within the first 4 years when used for recultivation and revitalization purposes. Recycling of wood ash (0.5–3 t ha- 1 before planting) for fertilisation of and Picea abies forest plantations are a sustainable and effective solution for the improvement of tree growth as well as an environmentally safe method of utilization of bioenergy production residues.

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171-178 T. Šima, L. Nozdrovický, K. Krištof, M. Dubeňová and J. Krupička
Impact of the quality of work of fertiliser spreader on nitrous oxide emissions released from soil to the atmosphere
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Impact of the quality of work of fertiliser spreader on nitrous oxide emissions released from soil to the atmosphere

T. Šima¹*, L. Nozdrovický¹, K. Krištof¹, M. Dubeňová² and J. Krupička³

¹Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Machines and Production Systems, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic; *Correspondence: tomasko.sima@gmail.com 2Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Production Engineering, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic 3Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Agricultural Machines, Kamýcká 129, 16521 Prague, Czech Republic

Abstract:

Quality of work of fertiliser spreader is one of the most important factors that affect the nitrous oxide (N2O) flux from soil to the atmosphere. Calk ammonium nitrate (CAN) with 27% nitrogen content was spread by a fertiliser spreader VICON RS-L connected with a tractor ZETOR 16145 and incorporated into the soil by a power harrow PÖTTINGER LION 301 six hours after its spreading. Application rate of fertiliser was set for 200 kg ha-1. There were selected five monitoring points based on the deviations of application rate for values 172.14, 188.01, 200.68, 213.08 and 227.34 kg ha-1, which means 46.48, 50.76, 54.18, 57.53 and 61.38 kg N ha-1, respectively. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after fertiliser application and incorporation into the soil by a photoacoustic field gas monitor INNOVA 1412 with a multipoint sampler INNOVA 1309. Concentration of N2O ranged from 0.4264 ppm to 1.2970 ppm. Maximum values were measured 21 days after fertilisation for each variant of the experiment. Based on the data obtained, there were found statistically significant differences among time intervals and among the size of deviations of the application rate at a 95.0% confidence level. Results have shown an impact of the 6% deviation (21 days after fertilisation) and 13.7% deviation (14 and 28 days after fertilisation) from the size of fertiliser application rate on nitrous oxide flux from soil to the atmosphere. There were also found the effects of time interval on nitrous oxide flux from soil to the atmosphere for each of the time intervals 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after fertilisation.

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111-116 T. Šima,, J. Krupička and L. Nozdrovický
Effect of nitrification inhibitors on fertiliser particle size distribution of the DASA® 26/13 and ENSIN® fertilisers
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Effect of nitrification inhibitors on fertiliser particle size distribution of the DASA® 26/13 and ENSIN® fertilisers

T. Šima¹,*, J. Krupička² and L. Nozdrovický³

1,3Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering,Department of Machines and Production Systems, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra,Slovak Republic; *Correspondence: tomasko.sima@gmail.com
²Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Departmentof Agricultural Machines, Kamýcká 129, 16521 Prague, Czech Republic

Abstract:

Effectiveness of the spinning disc fertiliser spreaders is affected by the physicalproperties of the fertiliser. One of the most important factors is the fertiliser particle-sizedistribution which depends upon the size of the fertiliser particles. The aim of the paper wascomparison of two very similar fertilisers from the same manufacturer DUSLO, Inc. usinggranulated nitrogen fertiliser with sulphur content DASA® 26/13 and nitrogen fertiliserENSIN® containing sulphur and nitrification inhibitors dicyandiamide DCD and 1, 2, 4 triazole– TZ. Comparison was done by evaluation of the particle-size distribution of the fertiliserseparated at first in the vertical air flow by K-293 Laboratory screening machine with steeplyincreasing flow speed. The airflow speed was regulated by airflow volume from 60 to 150 m3 h-1. Secondary separation was done by sieve screening of the samples by Haver EML digital plusTest Sieve Shaker. Sieves with square holes with dimensions 1 mm, 2 mm, 3.15 mm, 5 and10 mm were used. Both fertilisers meet the requirements of the manufacturer for grain-sizedistribution. Air flow separation shows higher variability of weight of the ENSIN fertiliserparticles in comparison with DASA fertiliser. Air flow 130 m3 h-1 separated all the particles ofDASA fertiliser. To separate all ENSIN® particles there was used air flow to 150 m3 h-1. Thesedifferences affect the quality of work of the spinning disc fertiliser spreader and cause non-uniformity in the field distribution of fertiliser which has negative environmental andeconomical effects.

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83–86 P. Lääniste, J. Jõudu and V. Eremeev
Oil content of spring oilseed rape seeds according to fertilisation
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Oil content of spring oilseed rape seeds according to fertilisation

P. Lääniste, J. Jõudu and V. Eremeev

Department of Field Crop Husbandry, Estonian Agricultural University, Kreutzwaldi 64, 51014 Tartu, Estonia; e-mail: lpeeter@eau.ee

Abstract:

Field trials, to investigate the effect of microfertilisers on the oil content of seeds of the oilseed rape cultivar ‘Mascot’, were carried out at the Department of Field Crop Husbandry in 2002-2003. We used in our trial 7 different microfertilisers. Prior to the sowing, the field was sprayed with herbicide EK Trifluralin and mineral fertiliser OptiCropNPK 21-08-12+S+Mg+B+Ca, calculating 120 kg N ha-1. Plants were treated with microfertilisers on 26 June. Analyses of test results revealed that different microelements influenced the oil content of rape seeds. The positive effect was noted in variants where rape plants were treated with micronutrients and micronutrients mixtures. The highest oil content, 43.4% of seeds dry matter, had Molybdenum-treated rape.

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