Tag Archives: health

xxx O. Zinina, S. Merenkova, D. Tazeddinova, M. Rebezov, M. Stuart, E. Okuskhanova, Zh. Yessimbekov and N. Baryshnikova
Enrichment of meat products with dietary fibers: a review
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Enrichment of meat products with dietary fibers: a review

O. Zinina¹, S. Merenkova¹*, D. Tazeddinova¹, M. Rebezov¹, M. Stuart², E. Okuskhanova³, Zh. Yessimbekov³ and N. Baryshnikova⁴

¹South Ural State University (national research university), Lenin Avenue 76, RU 454080 Chelyabinsk, Russia
²Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, 286 Plant Rd, ON K0J 1J0 Chalk River, Canada
³Shakarim State University of Semey, Glinka street 20a, KZ071400 Semey, Kazakhstan
⁴Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Lenin Avenue 38, RU455000 Magnitogorsk, Russia
*Correspondence: merenkovasp@susu.ru

Abstract:

In recent years, much attention has been paid to the development of food products with properties that can promote well-being and prevent disease. Tested strategies to improve the functional value of meat products through the introduction of dietary fiber are reviewed here. Based on the literature reviewed, the addition of dietary fiber in meat products contributes to the fabrication of products which enhance physiological functions. Furthermore, fibers can be used to improve the quality and yield of meat products.

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187-194 V. Poikalainen, J. Praks, I. Veermäe and E. Kokin
Infrared temperature patterns of cow’s body as an indicator for health control at precision cattle farming
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Infrared temperature patterns of cow’s body as an indicator for health control at precision cattle farming

V. Poikalainen, J. Praks, I. Veermäe and E. Kokin

Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, EE51014, Tartu, Estonia

Abstract:

Cows’ infrared radiation temperature study was carried out at experimental cowshed (120 cows) of Estonian University of Life Sciences. Thermal image scanner Fluke TiS was used for obtaining 640×480 pixels thermal images with resolution of 0.1°C. The temperature distribution pattern of different parts of cow’s body was estimated and analysed with SmartView software. Special attention was paid to udder, feet and areas with skin injuries. It was estimated that the temperature varies considerably at different parts of the body. Radiation temperature of healthy udder did not change considerably after milking. It means that automatic monitoring of udder temperature is possible not only in milking parlour or milking robot but also in other places where cows are identified. The udder thermograms enable to assess the milking hygiene, as the cleanliness of udder surface influences the measurement results, especially average temperature. The temperature of legs was lowest at the hoofs and highest at coronary band. Differences from this distribution may be used for estimation of leg disorders. Thermal images can be also successfully used for detection of skin injuries. Radiation temperature of injured and depilous locations was higher by several degrees than their surroundings. The study showed that thermal images analysis is promising method to be implemented at precision cattle farming.

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719-727 E. Rembiałkowska and D. Średnicka
Organic food quality and impact on human health
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Organic food quality and impact on human health

E. Rembiałkowska and D. Średnicka

Chair of Organic Foodstuffs, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Sciences,Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warszawa, Poland, phone: 48 22 5937038, fax: 48 22 5937036;e-mail: ewa_rembialkowska@sggw.pl.

Abstract:

During the last decades consumers‟ trust in food quality and safety has drastically decreased, mainly due to several food scandals and growing ecological awareness. Consumers have started to look for safer foods, produced in environmentally friendly, authentic and local systems. Organically produced foods are believed to satisfy these demands.Organic crops contain less nitrates and pesticide residues, but more dry matter, vitamin C,phenolic compounds, essential amino acids and sugars than conventional ones. Organically produced milk contains usually more dry matter, fat, calcium, selected vitamins and beneficial conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) compared to conventional milk from high input systems. Meat from organically raised cattle, pigs and sheep was found to contain less total fats and saturated fatty acids but higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and better n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio.The health effects of organic vs. conventional foods have been investigated in severalstudies. In vitro analyses indicated better repair of bacterial DNA and decrease of cancer cells proliferation on organic vs. conventional plant materials. Animal studies indicated better fertility indexes and increased immune parameters in organically fed animals. The effects of organic foods on human health are still not well known. However, according to PARSIFAL study children representing antrophosophic lifestyle, including biodynamic and organic food, had less allergies and lower body weight, while KOALA study associated consumption of organic dairy products with lower eczema risk in children.The overall number of studies analyzing the quality and safety of organic foods andinvestigating the health effects of organic food consumption is growing. However, the results are still insufficient to formulate the explicit conclusions.

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