Tag Archives: longevity

574–581 L. Leso, P. Pellegrini and M. Barbari
Effect of two housing systems on performance and longevity of dairy cows in Northern Italy
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Effect of two housing systems on performance and longevity of dairy cows in Northern Italy

L. Leso, P. Pellegrini and M. Barbari*

University of Florence, Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry, Via San Bonaventura, 13. IT50145 Firenze, Italy
*Correspondence: matteo.barbari@unifi.it

Abstract:

The objective of the current study was to evaluate and compare performance of dairy cows housed in compost-bedded pack barns (CBP) and free stall barns, with a focus on longevity-related parameters. Study included 30 commercial dairy farms located in the Po Valley, Italy. Twenty farms had free stall barns, among which 10 used rubber mattresses (FSM) and 10 used deep straw bedding (FSS). The remaining 10 farms had CBP. Monthly dairy herd records were obtained from the Italian DHI association for each farm included in the study over a period of one year. All farms were visited to measure characteristics and dimensions of housing facilities. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the association between housing system and the outcome variables. In CBP total available area was larger than both in FSM and FSS. However, space per cow over the bedded pack area in CBP (6.8 ± 2.4 m2 cow-1) was relatively low for this housing system. Milk production was similar among housing systems but somatic cell count and mastitis infection prevalence resulted to be higher in CBP than in FSM and FSS. Calving interval was lower in FSS compared with both FSM and CBP while no differences were found in number of services per pregnancy. Cows housed in CBP were older and had higher parities than those in FSM and FSS while no significant differences in herd turnover rate were detected among housing systems. Results confirm that CBP housing system may improve longevity of dairy cows, which is reported to be one of the most important motivations for building this kind of housing. Nevertheless, CBP housing can pose some challenges in achieving adequate udder health and high milk quality, especially with low space per cow.

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369–375 L. Cielava,, D. Jonkus and L. Paura
Lifetime milk productivity and quality in farms with different housing and feeding systems
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Lifetime milk productivity and quality in farms with different housing and feeding systems

L. Cielava¹,*, D. Jonkus¹ and L. Paura²

¹ Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Agrobiotechnologies, Lielā 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
² Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Information Technologies, Department of Control systems, Lielā 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: lasma.cielava@llu.lv

Abstract:

Housing and feeding systems in farms are main factors that affects cow milk productivity and its quality. The largest proportion of Latvian farms are small farms with tie stall housing system and grazing in summer. The aim of our study was to determine to what extent different housing and feeding systems affect the milk productivity, quality and cow longevity characterizing traits of Latvian dairy cows. In study we analysed 3,179 Holstein Black and White (HBW) and Latvian Brown (LB) breed cows from which 2,383 were located in 2 farms with loose housing system and TMR feeding and 796 cows were located in 8 small farms with tie stall housing system and different feed in summer and winter periods. The average daily milk yield significantly higher (p < 0.05) were in farms with loose housing system – 23.53 kg ECM, but in farms with Tie stall housing system was obtained 18.46 kg ECM per day. HBW breed cows characterized with lower somatic cell count in milk than Latvian brown in both housing systems. The highest somatic cell count in milk was obtained from third lactation LB breed cows in Tie stall housing system (249.11 thous. in 1mL-1 milk) and the lowest from HBW cows in loose housing system (127.57 thous. in 1mL-1 milk). Cows in smaller farms characterized with longer lifespan – 2,098.7 and 1,890 days for large farms, but lifetime milk productivity was significantly higher in farms with loose housing system where was obtained 21,315.9 kg ECM whereas in Tie stall system farms average life productivity was 19,740.2 kg ECM.

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435-440 Ü. Kristjuhan
Possibilities of prolonging human life in the near future
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Possibilities of prolonging human life in the near future

Ü. Kristjuhan

Chair of Labour Environment and Safety, Tallinn University of Technology,Ehitajate tee 5, EE19086 Tallinn, Estonia; e-mail: ulo.kristjuhan@ttu.ee

Abstract:

People are interested in health and long life. As a result of their activities, health isimproving and average life expectancy is increasing in most countries by two to three monthsevery year. It is around 76 years in Estonia and nearly 80 years in the European Union (onaverage) at present. Life expectancy is projected to increase to 84.6 years for men and to 89.1years for women in Europe by 2060. However, these figures are likely to be overly pessimistic.There are many ways of accelerating progress. Many of these are health behaviours: avoidingstress, controlling blood pressure, exercising and healthy diets do not require much additionalexpense. A combination of such measures can have an impressive effect on health and lifeexpectancy. Our experimental studies in the industry have shown that it is possible to postponeage-related changes by up to 20 years at present. More rapid prolonging of human life ispossible by advancing biogerontological studies and intervention programmes that need moreresources than they currently have available to them.

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