Tag Archives: pepper

430–437 G. Glatkova and Z. Pacanoski
Evaluating the effects of application modes and soil types on the herbicide efficacy and crop yield of pendimethalin and clomazone on transplanted pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)
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Evaluating the effects of application modes and soil types on the herbicide efficacy and crop yield of pendimethalin and clomazone on transplanted pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

G. Glatkova¹* and Z. Pacanoski²

¹University Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Agriculture Institute, 16-ta Makedonska brigada 3A, MK1000 Skopje, Republic Macedonia
²University Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Faculty for Agricultural Sciences and Food, 16-ta Makedonska brigada 3, MK1000 Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
*Correspondence: gordana_glatkova@yahoo.com

Abstract:

Field experiment was carried out in 2014 and 2015 in two locations Kochani and Drachevo in Republic of Macedonia to evaluate the efficacy and crop safety of pendimethalin and clomazone on transplanted pepper according to mode of application, (pretransplant -PRE-T and pretransplant incorporated -PTI) and soil types (alluvial soil and vertisol). The weed population in both years and locations mainly consisted annual spring and summer grasses and broadleaf weeds. Weed competition significantly reduced pepper yield. There was no recorded difference between the efficacy of pendimethalin PRE-T and pendimethalin PTI. However, the efficacy of clomazone PTI was higher than that of clomazone PRE-T in both experimental years and locations, indicating incorporation into soil if critical for clamazone. Both pendimethalin and clomazone had low efficacy on Solanum nigrum L. Pepper plants were not visibly injured by any herbicides treatments. In summary, locations and soil types did not affect herbicide efficacy and pepper selectivity. Pepper yield was markedly affected by herbicide efficacy in both years and locations.

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39–48 M. Järvan and P. Põldma
Content of plant nutrients in vegetables depending on various lime materials used for neutralising bog peat
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Content of plant nutrients in vegetables depending on various lime materials used for neutralising bog peat

M. Järvan¹ and P. Põldma²

¹Department of Field Crops, Estonian Research Institute of Agriculture, Teaduse 13, 75501 Saku, Estonia; e-mail: malle.jarvan@mail.ee
²Department of Horticulture, Estonian Agricultural University, Kreutzwaldi 64, 51014 Tartu, Estonia; e-mail: ppoldma@eau.ee

Abstract:

The trials were performed in the years 1998–2000 in Saku (59°18’N, 24º39’E) in greenhouse conditions. The aim was to establish how lime materials used for the neutralisation of bog peat acidity (oil shale ash, clinker dust, limestone meal, dolomite meal and their mixtures), which changed significantly the contents of available Ca, K and Mg in the peat substrata, affect the mineral composition of vegetable leaves (lettuce, cucumber, tomato, paprika) and the mutual relationships between elements (K, Ca, Mg, P). In the case of all vegetables, a strong Ca and Mg antagonism occurred. The Mg content of plants was very sensitive to the Ca:Mg ratio in the lime material used for peat neutralisation. In the case of limestone meal, the tomato plants contained Mg 0.18–0.24% and cucumber plants 0.36–0.40%; in the case of dolomite meal, 0.66–0.71% and 0.78–0.90, respectively. The Ca and K contents of vegetables were somewhat less affected by the difference of lime materials than the Mg content. Abundant Mg in lime material increased P content in plants, a synergism between Mg and P occurred.
Lettuce grown on substrata neutralised with mixtures of limestone and dolomite meal contained less nitrates than that grown on substrata with clinker dust and oil shale ash. Too high K content in the substrate neutralised with clinker dust had a negative effect on the carotene content of lettuce.

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