Tag Archives: pig

xxx P.F.P. Ferraz, V.G. Cadavid, G.A.S. Ferraz, J.A.O. Saraz, G. Rossi and M. Barbari
Decision three to predict respiratory rate of piglets submitted to cold conditions
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Decision three to predict respiratory rate of piglets submitted to cold conditions

P.F.P. Ferraz¹*, V.G. Cadavid², G.A.S. Ferraz¹, J.A.O. Saraz², G. Rossi³ and M. Barbari³

¹Federal University of Lavras, Agricultural Engineering Department, Campus
Universitário, PO Box 3037, CEP 37200-000 Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
²Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellin, Facultad de Cuencias Agrarias, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y de Alimentos, PO Box 050034 Medellín, Colombia
³University of Florence, Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry, 13 Via San Bonaventura, IT50145 Firenze, Italy
*Correspondence: paricia.ponciano@ufla.br

Abstract:

Pigs subjected to thermal conditions outside their comfort zones may show altered physiological and behavioural responses, which may consequently cause productive losses. For these reasons, the aim of this paper is to develop a decision tree for the prediction of respiratory rate (RR, mov min-1) of piglets exposed to different thermal situations. The experiment was carried out in an experimental pig farm of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia Campus Medellin, located at the San Pablo Agraria Experimental Station located in the eastern sector of the department of Antioquia, during August 2019. A database containing the raw data for dry bulb temperature – tdb (°C), and relative humidity – RH (%) as input variables, and RR (mov min-1) of six piglets were assessed every two hours as output variable for piglets was generated. The experimental database was composed of 78 observed data. The decision trees were developed to conditions of tdb between 19.2 to 29.5 °C and RH between 50.2 to 88.4%. In the experimental period, RR of piglets submitted to tdb higher than 27.1 °C the RR was around 60 mov min-1, tdb smaller than 27.1 °C the RR varied from 36 to 46 mov min-1. These low values of physiological responses may indicate that the piglets are not in a comfortable situation, so their development, welfare and production can be affected. The decision tree developed can be useful to provide a quick understanding of the piglet’s welfare condition based on the environmental variables and physiological responses.

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176–185 N. Lebedová, R. Stupka, J. Čítek, M. Okrouhlá and K. Zadinová
Effect of feed restriction on muscle fibre characteristics and meat quality traits in pigs
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Effect of feed restriction on muscle fibre characteristics and meat quality traits in pigs

N. Lebedová*, R. Stupka, J. Čítek, M. Okrouhlá and K. Zadinová

Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Department of Animal Science, Kamýcká 129, CZ16500 Prague, Czech Republic
*Correspondence: lebedova@af.czu.cz

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feed restriction on muscle fibre composition and meat quality traits in pigs. Forty crossbred pigs (Pietrain × Large WhiteSire) × (Landrace × Large WhiteDam) were divided into two feeding groups: ad libitum (AL) and restricted (R1). The effects of feed restriction on muscle fibre characteristics of the musculus longissimus lumborum et thoracis (MLLT) and meat quality traits were evaluated. Muscle fibres were stained and classified as fibre types I, IIA, and IIB. For each muscle fibre type, the fibre density, fibre cross-section area (CSA), and fibre proportion were determined. Fibres IIB were divided into small- (diameter < 46 μm), medium- (diameter 46–86 μm) and large-sized (diameter > 86 μm) fibres. The AL group had significantly lower (P < 0.05) percentage area of IIB fibres and lower (P < 0.01) CSA of IIB fibres than did the R1 group. The R1 group had significantly greater content of large-sized IIB fibres and smaller content of medium-sized IIB fibres than did the AL group (P < 0.05). The group fed ad libitum had greater backfat thickness and smaller lean meat content and tended to have better meat quality traits compared to the restricted group. The results of this study show that strong feed restriction had a negative effect on muscle fibre composition, especially on the amount of large-sized fibres IIB, which are associated with poor meat quality.

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2211-2228 K. Vehovský, K. Zadinová, R. Stupka, J. Čítek, N. Lebedová, M. Okrouhlá and M. Šprysl
Fatty acid composition in pork fat: De-novo synthesis, fatty acid sources and influencing factors – a review
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Fatty acid composition in pork fat: De-novo synthesis, fatty acid sources and influencing factors – a review

K. Vehovský, K. Zadinová*, R. Stupka, J. Čítek, N. Lebedová, M. Okrouhlá and M. Šprysl

Czech University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Department of Animal Husbandry, Kamýcká 129, CZ165 00, Prague – Suchdol, Czech Republic
*Corresponding author: zadinova@af.czu.cz

Abstract:

Fats are among the basic nutrients the human organism needs as a source of energy, as well as to grow and regenerate cells, tissues, and organs. Particularly animal fats, with their higher proportion of saturated fatty acids and low content of n-3 fatty acids, are often seen by the public as relatively undesirable food components. Fatty acid (FA) composition of pork is affected by many factors: genotype, breeding, gender and feeding methods. Numerous research teams, therefore, have searched for means of effectively manipulating the chemical composition of animal fats. This paper reviews existing knowledge and means of effectively influencing the fatty acid composition in pig fat, which is a significant component of human food in European countries due to their high consumption of pork. The findings of various authors demonstrate that not only altering of fatty acids sources in animal diets but a range of other factors as well can significantly influence the composition of fatty acids in pig fat and consequently pork quality.

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207-214 M. Dubeňová, T. Šima, R. Gálik, Š. Mihina, G. Vagač and Š. Boďo
Reduction of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide in the pig barn piggery by different ventilation system intensities
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Reduction of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide in the pig barn piggery by different ventilation system intensities

M. Dubeňová¹, T. Šima²⋅*, R. Gálik¹, Š. Mihina¹, G. Vagač³ and Š. Boďo¹

¹Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Production Engineering, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic 2Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Machines and Production Systems, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic; *Correspondence: tomasko.sima@gmail.com 3Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Agrobiology and Food Resources, Department of Animal Husbandry, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 94976 Nitra, Slovak Republic

Abstract:

Agriculture, especially animal production, is one of the most important factors influencing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and causing global warming. The ventilation system in a piggery has a significant impact to carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations. The concentrations of these gases in pig housing also affect the air quality and welfare of animals. The aim of the paper was to analyze the effect of ventilation system intensity on the concentration of CO2 and N2O in a piggery. An experiment was carried out at the Experimental Centre for Livestock at the Department of Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Agrobiology and Food Resources, the Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovakia. The concentrations were measured by a photoacoustic field gas monitor INNOVA 1412 connected to a multipoint sampler INNOVA 1309. Three levels of ventilation system intensity were used: low, medium and high. Fattening pigs, the Large White breed were housed in the piggery. For our experiment, three sensors were used inside and two sensors outside the barn. Based on the gathered data, statistically significant differences were found between different ventilation system intensities at a 95.0% confidence level. The concentration of gases fluctuates during day time interval and, based on the results, it is possible to set up a ventilation system intensity to create the best possible air quality in a building for pigs.

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