Tag Archives: weed

317-322 D. Kavaliauskaitė, J. Jankauskienė, E. Survilienė, O. Bundinienė,R. Starkutė, V. Zalatorius and R. Karklelienė
Competitive interaction between red beet and weeds, as affected by different weeding time
Abstract |
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Competitive interaction between red beet and weeds, as affected by different weeding time

D. Kavaliauskaitė, J. Jankauskienė, E. Survilienė, O. Bundinienė,R. Starkutė, V. Zalatorius and R. Karklelienė

Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Kauno str. 30, LT-543333, Babtai, Kaunas distr., Lithuania,telephone: +370-37-555-226, fax: +370-37-555-176, e-mail: d.kavaliauskaite@lsdi.lt

Abstract:

The competitive interactions between two red beet cultivars (‘Pablo F ’, prostrate,1and ‘Kamuoliai’, ect.) and weeds, affected at different weeding times, were studied for three years at the Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture. In all years, a long period of weeding gave lower crop biomass reduction of both cultivars. When weeding was delayed from 2 to 12 weeks after red beet germination the crop biomass of both cultivars was reduced by much more than half. From weed density studies, crop competition during long period of weeding reduced the number of germinating weed species and lowered seed germination of Chenopodium album L., Galinsoga parviflora Cav., Cappsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., Stellaria media (L.) Vill. The two cultivars of red beet showed the same response to competition.

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465-470 L. Sarunaite, I. Deveikyte, R. Semaskiene and Z. Kadziuliene
The influence of grain legumes on spring wheat yield formation and phytosanitary state
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The influence of grain legumes on spring wheat yield formation and phytosanitary state

L. Sarunaite, I. Deveikyte, R. Semaskiene and Z. Kadziuliene

Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture, Instituto al. 1, Akademija, Kedainiai LT-58344, Lithuania;e-mail: lina@lzi.lt

Abstract:

The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of grain legumes on spring wheat yield, its quality and phytosanitary state in an organic farming system. The experiment was carried out in 2007 and 2008 at the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture in Dotnuva on a loamy Endocalcari-Ephypogleyic Cambisol. Grain legumes – pea, lupine, bean, vetch and wheat were sown as intercrops and sole crops, and were grown organically for grain. The productivity and phytosanitary state of spring wheat sole crops or intercrops depended on the species of grain legume, however, the results varied over the experimental years. In 2007, the vetch and wheat intercrop produced a significantly higher grain yield than wheat in sole crop or in other intercrops. In 2008, no advantages of legume and wheat intercrops were revealed. The nitrogen content was higher in wheat when it was grown with legumes.

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542-547 A. Velykis, S. Maiksteniene, A. Arlauskiene, I. Kristaponyte and A. Satkus
Mechanical weed control in organically grown spring oat and field pea crops
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Mechanical weed control in organically grown spring oat and field pea crops

A. Velykis, S. Maiksteniene, A. Arlauskiene, I. Kristaponyte and A. Satkus

Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture, Joniskelis Research Station,Joniskelis, LT–39301 Pasvalys District, Lithuania; e–mail: velykisalex@gmail.com

Abstract:

Experiments to study the effects of weed harrowing in an organic farming system were carried out during 2005–2007 at the Joniskelis Experimental Station of the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture on a clay loam Gleyic Cambisol. Spring oat (Avena sativa L.) and field pea (Pisum sativum L.) crops were harrowed once and twice with a Regent spring-tine harrow at pre-emergence, early post-emergence and late post-emergence stages. This study indicates that at early growth stages of crops the uprooting effect of harrowing could be more important for weed control than at late stages. Early post-emergence harrowing (at 2–3 leaf stage) was the most effective for spring oat. Twice (pre-emergence and early post-emergence) harrowing of oat was not more effective than early post-emergence harrowing once, since early harrowing stimulates new sprouting of weeds. Pea crop damage by harrowing was less when the crop was harrowed at late post-emergence (beginning of stem elongation) stage. No difference of crop yield was determined among the treatments.

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217-220 D. Kavaliauskaitė and Č. Bobinas
Determination of weed competition critical period in red beet
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Determination of weed competition critical period in red beet

D. Kavaliauskaitė and Č. Bobinas

Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, LT-54333 Babtai, Kauno 30, Kaunas distr.,e-mail: d.kavaliauskaite@lsdi.lt

Abstract:

The field experiment was conducted at the Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture from 2000-2002 to determine the critical period of weed competition in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hybrid ‘Pablo’ crop. Weeding was delayed until 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 weeks after red beet germination (WAG) and was carried out during the first 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 WAG. Weed competition during the first 10 to 12 WAG reduced the marketable yield of red beet by 100%. Competition in the first 8 WAG reduced yield by 92.2%. Competition in the first 2 WAG had no adverse effect on yield; there was only an 8.3% reduction of red beet yield. A period of weeding for 4 WAG provided a yield similar to that achieved with 6 weeks of weeding. It is concluded that the first 4 WAG are the most critical for weed competition in red beet crop at a 5% yield loss level. Weeds emerging later do not appear to be detrimental to red beet growth and marketable yield.

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241-245 J. Korolova, D. Lapinsh and A. Berzinsh
Weed dynamics in differently managed fields
Abstract |

Weed dynamics in differently managed fields

J. Korolova¹, D. Lapinsh² and A. Berzinsh²

¹Department of Control System, Latvia University of Agriculture, Liela iela 2, Jelgava, Latvia;e-mail: jelena.korolova@llu.lv
²Institute of Soil and Plant Sciences, Latvia University of Agriculture, Liela iela 2, Jelgava,Latvia; e-mail: dainis.lapins@llu.lv; andris.berzins@llu.lv

Abstract:

Latvia is characterized by variation among farms. Analysis of the dynamics of weed diversity is based on monitoring sowings during 1997–2004 in westerly and central regions of Latvia. The aim of this research was to compare the dynamics of weed on unchanging types of grain sown, fields with elevated grain density and un-utilised agricultural land. Two hypotheses were put forward: the dynamic of several species of weeds to impact the total number of weeds in land laying waste (un-utilised agricultural land), and the increase in the numbers of several specific weeds in fields with elevated grain density using annual herbicides.

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