Tag Archives: weight monitoring

xxx A. Zacepins, N. Ozols, A. Kviesis, J. Gailis, V. Komasilovs, O. Komasilova and V. Zagorska
Evaluation of the honey bee colonies weight gain during the intensive foraging period
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Evaluation of the honey bee colonies weight gain during the intensive foraging period

A. Zacepins¹*, N. Ozols², A. Kviesis¹, J. Gailis², V. Komasilovs¹, O. Komasilova¹ and V. Zagorska²

¹Department of Computer Systems, Faculty of Information Technologies, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Liela iela 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
²Institute of Plant Protection Research ‘Agrihorts’, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Paula Lejina iela 2, LV-3004 Jelgava, Latvia
*Correspondence: aleksejs.zacepins@llu.lv

Abstract:

Beekeeping in Latvia has a long tradition and it is a classical branch of agriculture. In Latvia, there is no traditional beekeeping region, and beekeeping is performed in all regions. Honey yield is influenced by various factors – variety of crops (nectar plants) around the apiary, man-made changes in land/forests (deforestation), climate change, beekeepers’ actions, etc. Application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the field of beekeeping can bring benefits to the beekeepers. To be more specific, continuous remote monitoring of certain bee colony parameters can improve beekeeper’s apiary management, by informing timely about the nectar flow (or even provide information on bee colony states, e.g., swarming). In such a way, beekeepers can plan their next actions – prepare supers or even choose to move the apiary to a different geographical location. Within this research, weight gain of the ten honey bee colonies was remotely monitored and analysed during two-week period at the beginning of the summer 2021 in Vecauce, Latvia, using the precision beekeeping approach. This monitoring period corresponded to intensive flowering of the winter rapeseed and field beans. Colonies were equipped with the automatic scales. In addition, colony and environmental temperature was monitored. Measurements were taken every thirty minutes. Analysing the obtained data, weight increase can be observed in all colonies, from 17 to 48 kg. As well, based on weight data, swarming event can be identified. Constant monitoring of weight change can also help to identify daily patterns in honey bee activity.

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585–593 A. Zacepins, A. Pecka, V. Osadcuks, A. Kviesis and S. Engel
Solution for automated bee colony weight monitoring
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Solution for automated bee colony weight monitoring

A. Zacepins¹*, A. Pecka², V. Osadcuks², A. Kviesis¹ and S. Engel³

¹Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Information Technologies, Department of Computer Systems, Liela iela 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
²Latvia University of Agriculture, Faculty of Engineering, Institute of Energetics, J. Cakstes blvd. 5, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
³Cyberkinetics, Inc., 112 North Curry Street, Carson City, Nevada, USA
*Correspondence: aleksejs.zacepins@llu.lv

Abstract:

Future of the traditional beekeeping is to implement Precision Beekeeping approach and implement different automated and smart apiary monitoring systems for remote and optimised bee colony management. Behaviour of the bee colony can be monitored by the use of temperature, humidity, acoustic, video and weight systems. Each measurement system can give its own additional value for recognition of bee colony state. It is useful for the beekeeper to have at least one control colony with weight system equipped in the apiary. The hive scales is an important tool which gives assessment if food consumption has been high and whether there is a need for feeding. In most countries it is important to know how long the winter storage is, in addition it gives a very good indication of periods without any nectar flow. This paper presents conceptual design and prototype of honey bee colony weight monitoring system with GSM/GPRS external interface for packet-based communication with remote server. The central module with scales is placed on one of the hives and consists of temperature sensor, 4 strain gauge load cells for weighting purposes, RF and GSM/GPRS modules, photovoltaic cell array, battery, charge controller and minimal user interface for operational status signalling. The system allows sensor data logging to local storage and periodic data transfer to a remote server for further data analysis in different user applications. Data processing back-end component serves GET requests coming from remote measurement device, performs identification and raw data conversion using configuration stored in database.

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