Tag Archives: Whey

2260–2268 V. V. Eveleva , T. M. Cherpalova, E. A. Shipovskaya and N. A. Korshunova
Technological features of production of lactate-containing additives from milk whey fermented with lactic acid bacteria
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Technological features of production of lactate-containing additives from milk whey fermented with lactic acid bacteria

V. V. Eveleva¹* , T. M. Cherpalova¹, E. A. Shipovskaya¹ and N. A. Korshunova²

¹All-Russia Research Institute of Food Additives – Branch of the Federal Budget Research Institution ‘V. M. Gorbatov Federal Research Center for Food Systems’ of RAS, 55 Liteyny ave., RU191014 Saint Petersburg, Russia
²Saint Petersburg National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), 9 Lomonosov str., RU191002 Saint Petersburg, Russia
*Correspondence: v.eveleva@yandex.ru

Abstract:

Milk whey becomes a product of interest to researchers and manufacturers due to stricter environmental protection requirements. This paper discusses bioconversion of whey lactose into lactate-containing additives using microorganisms of Lactobacillus genus. The biotransformation of lactose from curd whey and standard solutions of cheese whey into lactic acid derivatives was assessed by the following parameters: the productivity of lactic acid bacteria, the rate of lactose fermentation, the total amount of calcium lactate and its formation rate. Selection of the medium preparation and lactic acid biosynthesis parameters based on these measurements proved to yield optimal results. Lactic acid bacteria from the subgroup of thermophilic bacilli L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, L. helveticus, L. рlantarum were also tested. The optimal synthetic activity in the terms of calcium lactate turnover and formation rate was demonstrated by L. acidophilus in a medium based on the concentrated whey with 8% lactose.

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801-806 A. Sats, H. Mootse, S. Pajumägi, A. Pisponen, V. Tatar and V. Poikalainen
Estimation of Particle Size Distribution in Bovine Colostrum Whey by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) Method
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Estimation of Particle Size Distribution in Bovine Colostrum Whey by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) Method

A. Sats*, H. Mootse, S. Pajumägi, A. Pisponen, V. Tatar and V. Poikalainen

Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kreutzwaldi ⁵⁶/⁵, EE⁵¹0¹⁴ Tartu, Estonia; *Correspondence: andres.sats@emu.ee

Abstract:

Colostrum whey consist bioactive compounds in considerable concentration. For isolation of these compounds the particle size has crucial importance. The aim of this work was to study possibilities of using dynamic light scattering method – DLS (Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS) for colostrum whey particle size distribution estimation. The first and second milking colostrum samples were skimmed by centrifugal separation and casein of these was enzymatically coagulated by rennet (chymosin). Obtained whey was diluted (¹:²00) by distilled water and filtered (cut-off 0.⁴⁵ m) to get probes for estimation of particle size. Particle size distribution in colostrum whey probes had maximally three peaks and polydispersity indices from 0.¹⁵⁷ to 0.⁵⁴¹. Prevailing peak of the distribution was found at size from ¹⁴⁴ to ²¹0 nm, which apparently corresponds to hydrodynamic diameter of immunoglobulin IgG¹.

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