Tag Archives: working environment

211-218 O. Sada, E. Mikson and B. Reppo
Ammonia emission in cowsheds and pigsties during the summer periood
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Ammonia emission in cowsheds and pigsties during the summer periood

O. Sada, E. Mikson and B. Reppo

Institute of Technology, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56,
EE51014 Tartu, Estonia

Abstract:

As is known, cows in uninsulated cowsheds can tolerate lower temperatures much better than higher temperatures, so we can say that these buildings are well suited for animals, although there are problems with workers and the working environment in uninsulated cowsheds in extreme cases, during very low and high outside temperatures. The goal of this study was to identify the outdoor climate impact on the indoor climate in cowsheds with 420, 500 and 500 cow places during winter and summertime. For that, indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity and indoor ammonia content were measured simultaneously. The processed results are well applicable when designing new cattle housing or improving the indoor climate of already existing uninsulated cowsheds. Building of large pigsties with deep litter and without litter which use liquid manure removal systems has become a wide practice nowadays. Indoor climate parameters of the working environment have an impact on the human capacity for work and the productivity of animals. Enlargement of pigsties is accompanied with problems regarding the achievement of the required indoor climate for the working environment. For the purpose of studying the pigsties with different animal-keeping technologies and the simultaneous effect of temperature and relative humidity on the emission ammonia content in the air of a pigsty were measured in summer above a pig-pen at the height of 1.5 meters from the floor and were measured daily. Data logger equipment, relevant sensors and content of ammonia in the air was measured for the study by using Gas Monitor Pac III equipment. Measurement results were statistically processed by using the computer programmes AMR Win Control, Pac III Software3.nn, SAS and MS Excel.

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45–54 O. Sada and B. Reppo
Impact of tending work on pigsty inner climate in winter
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Impact of tending work on pigsty inner climate in winter

O. Sada and B. Reppo

Institute of Technology, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi St. 64, 51014 Tartu, Estonia; e-mail: boris.reppo@emu.ee

Abstract:

Inner climate at pigsty is in strong correlation with outdoor climate and tending work. Up to now, main research has been conducted to investigate air temperature and relative humidity, in order to be able to offer solutions to pigsty ventilation. At the same time, little data can be found about pigsty air gas content depending on pigs’ function work. With the aim of investigating the impact of outdoor climate and tending work on the inner climate at a pigsty of fatlings and youngs, the research was conducted to measure the air temperature, relative humidity and the content of oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia at these pigsties in winter time diurnally at the height of 1.5 meters. To measure the inner climate, Data Logger, appropriate sensors and the computer program PC AMR Win Control were used. At the same time, the winter outdoor air temperature and relative humidity were measured using Rotronic logger. The results of the research presented in the article concern the air temperature and velocity, relative humidity and the content of oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia of the working environment, measured in different places and heights of the room during daytime and diurnally above the pigpen. It became evident that the pigsty’s inner air temperature was within the extent recommended, but the air relative humidity increased partly very high. The carbon dioxide content partly exceeded the established limits. The average measured ammonia also exceeded the limits in some cases but always increased during the tending work.

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