Tag Archives: vegetables

2012–2025 N. Montemurro, G. Cucci, M. A. Mastro, G. Lacolla and A. Lonigro
The nitrogen role in vegetables irrigated with treated municipal wastewater
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The nitrogen role in vegetables irrigated with treated municipal wastewater

N. Montemurro, G. Cucci*, M. A. Mastro, G. Lacolla and A. Lonigro

Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences – University of Bari – Via Amendola 165/A, IT70126 Bari, Italy
*Correspondence: giovanna.cucci@uniba.it

Abstract:

The reuse of treated municipal wastewater for irrigation is an established alternative to conventional water, in many countries of the world, particularly where or when water resources are extremely limited. Wastewater reuse could represent a double benefit when used in agriculture, helping overcome any lack of water resources and additionally, enriching the soil with nutrients – especially nitrogen and phosphorus.
In the experimental site of Castellana Grotte (Apulia region, Southern Italy) during the 2012/13 and 2013/14 growing seasons, vegetable crops (fennel and lettuce) in succession were drip-irrigated with three different water sources. Two reclaimed water streams, obtained by applying different treatment schemes to the same municipal wastewater (an effluent from the full-scale treatment plant and an effluent from the Integrated Fixed-film Activated Sludge – Membrane BioReactor pilot plant) and a conventional source, to verify the crops response and nutrient contribution through wastewater supply.
Both lettuce and fennel yields were enhanced by the high content of nutrients in the effluent of one of the treatment plants, which had been operated for partial nitrogen removal. For Fennel 2013/14, wastewater-reuse led to a 54% reduction of nitrogen supply in relation to the other plots normally fertilized. In this way, an estimated saving of about 98.00 € ha-1 was achieved.
Crops irrigated with treated wastewater operated for partial nitrogen removal (IMBR) showed early ripening (8 days for lettuce and 35 days for fennel 2013/14) and better quality than others not similarly-treated. However, the wastewater presented a nitrate content in excess of legal limits (35 mg L-1, D.M. 185/2003). Therefore, the contribution of nutrients increased production (47 vs 32 t ha-1 in IMBR and WELL 2012/13 fennel theses, 53 vs 31 t ha-1 in IMBR and WELL 2013 lettuce theses and 40 vs 31 t ha-1 in IMBR and WELL 2013/14 fennel theses respectively) and improved product quality, while simultaneously saving money for chemical fertilizers not supplied, producing less environmental impact.

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1426–1434 P. Vaculik,, A. Smejtkova, M. Prikryl, O. Drabek, Z. Votruba and L. Lexa
Selected wastewater parameters from the vegetable washing process
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Selected wastewater parameters from the vegetable washing process

P. Vaculik¹,*, A. Smejtkova¹, M. Prikryl¹, O. Drabek², Z. Votruba¹ and L. Lexa¹

¹ Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Building Technological Equipment, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
² Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
* Correspondence: vaculik@tf.czu.cz

Abstract:

This article follows selected parameters in wastewater which arise from the washing process for root vegetables, which is one of those problems which are current in terms of water usage. With a growing population, industrialisation, and urban development, there is also a growing demand for water resources. Industries which are dealing with the processing of agricultural products and food production in general significantly contribute to the growing consumption of water. Technology which is used for cleaning vegetables also significantly affect this growth in water consumption. Increasing demands on the quality of vegetables (eg. the cleanliness of vegetables at the point of sale), also leads to the necessity for more effective postharvest cleaning, something which is carried out both with dry and wet methods. This article examines the cleaning process for selected root vegetables, particularly carrots and potatoes, by determining selected properties of the output process water in an assessed technological line. This line is specific with regard to its methods for cleaning carrots and potatoes. Following the investigation, the line was assessed as being satisfactory with respect to the quality of the input and output water. The monitored parameters of the process water (eg. concentrations of selected elements in the process water and concentrations of selected inorganic anions in the process water, mainly Na and Pb) from cleaning carrots and potatoes were considered as being satisfactory for recirculation into the cleaning process and therefore a reduction was achieved in overall water consumption.

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